Posted by Steve Lettau on Sep 20, 2018

"Never miss a good chance to shut up." - Will Rogers

Thought of the Week Steve Lettau 2018-09-20 05:00:00Z 0
A Rotary LOL Moment Steve Lettau 2018-09-20 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Sep 20, 2018

Our next meeting will be Friday (9/21) at Newcastle Place, 12600 N. Port Washington Road, Mequon, WI 53092.

Our program for Friday’s meeting will feature Karl Hertz who will speak about United Way.

The greeter will provide either the thought, a Rotary minute, share a family moment or a cultural tradition ... anything they would like to start off the day positive.

Upcoming "It's your Rotary moment" assignees:

  • Kimberly Metz (9/21)
  • Lance Parve (9/28)
  • Steve Peterman (10/5)
  • Connie Pukaite (10/12)

Note: If you are unable to act as "It's your Rotary moment" assignee when scheduled please arrange for your replacement.

Visit our website at mtsunriserotary.org.

Club Meeting Information Steve Lettau 2018-09-20 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Sep 03, 2018

Back Story:

Lynn Streeter introduced us to an exceptional young man by the name of Matthew Ceelen. Matt's story began with a letter to our club requesting financial support for his Eagle Scout project of building two bat houses to be placed in the Mequon Nature Preserve. With the request approved, we heard what Paul Harvey used to call "The rest of the story".

Matthew was diagnosed with bone cancer just weeks shy of his 15th birthday. In medical terms it is a high grade sclerosing subtype of osteosarcoma. Approximately 450 children in North America are diagnosed with osteosarcoma each year. He is 1 of approximately 4 children who will be diagnosed with his subtype of osteosarcoma in 2017. 

Update:

Matthew is celebrating his 16th birthday today. His birthday weekend started by watching the Badger Football team beat Western Kentucky. An early morning flight to Atlanta followed on Saturday. This trip was one thing Matthew had to look forward as he finished his freshman studies throughout the summer. The highlight of his trip was attending his first Boston Red Sox VICTORY over the Atlanta Braves with his parents and his friend Zach.

What a difference a year makes! He rang the bell on Aug 17 and celebrated the end of his treatment with all of you. He helped move Natalie to her dorm shortly before his school year started. The first week of his sophomore year ended with tests at Children's Hospital of Wisconsin. There is no sign of cancer!

Keep Matthew Strong - An Update Steve Lettau 2018-09-03 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Sep 03, 2018

Elisabeth, our Rotary Exchange Student, had a great audition with Mr. Emanuelson and she is now a member of the elite HHS Chamber Orchestra. Way to go, Elisabeth!

Elisabeth's Orchestra Update Steve Lettau 2018-09-03 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Aug 31, 2018

Guests at this morning's meeting included (from left): Elisabeth Burschel (Rotary Exchange Student), Gustavo Arriba, Imelda Arriba, Raquel Arriba, Angie Rester and Jan Blazich.  Angie and Gustavo are with the Amigos Club, and the Arribas will be Elisabeth's winter host family. (Photo by Bob Blazich)

Friday Rotary Steve Lettau 2018-08-31 05:00:00Z 0
Advocates Meal Preparation and Family Cookout Steve Lettau 2018-08-30 05:00:00Z 0
Become a Lobsterfest Sponsor Steve Lettau 2018-08-23 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Aug 17, 2018

Three Homestead High School Rotaract students shared their experiences as World Affairs Seminar attendees during our weekly club meeting.

World Affairs Seminar is an international youth initiative of Rotary International District 6270.  Our vision is to bring better understanding of world problems to young people from around the globe, using current issues as a learning platform. In the course of this study, the WAS provides opportunities for participants to discuss issues with other young people from around the world. Emphasis is on promoting better understanding of the causes of international conflict.  The idea is if the causes are understood and solutions developed in a cooperative environment, problems are more likely to be solved peacefully. Photo by Bob Blazich.

World Affairs Seminar Experiences Steve Lettau 2018-08-17 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Aug 17, 2018

Kelli Groom was inducted into the MT Sunrise Rotary club during this week's meeting. Pictured from left: Tim Hamilton (President Elect), Danielle Deller (Kelli's sponsor), Kelli Groom and Michael Shay (Secretary). Photo by Bob Blazich.

Kelli Groom welcomed into Rotary Steve Lettau 2018-08-17 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Aug 17, 2018

This article appeared in the August, 14 2018 edition of the News Graphic 

MEQUON — The Mequon Thiensville Sunrise Rotary Club will host its 21st annual Rotary Lobsterfest fundraiser from 5:30 p.m. to to 9 p.m. Sept. 15 at the River Club of Mequon, 12400 N. Ville Du Parc Drive. This year the fundraiser will again feature a wonderful whole Maine lobster dinner (and other dinner options) with fun and interesting auctions to support great causes.

Rotary is a volunteer organization of business and professional leaders who strive to serve local and international communities through humanitarian and community service initiatives. This year Rotary set out to plant one tree for each of its 1.2 million worldwide members to restore the globe’s dwindling tree canopy and improve the world’s atmosphere. Rotarians exceeded that goal by more than 3 million trees.

A cracking good time Steve Lettau 2018-08-17 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Aug 13, 2018

Our speakers last Friday were Terry and Cindy Schacht with Lance and Julie Parve.  Terry and Cindy will be sharing their experiences on their recent trip to Kenya and Tanzania with Hope Without Borders (“HWB”) and the good work being done through Lance and Julie’s organization HWB.  Pictured above from left: Terry Schacht, Cindy Schacht, Julie Parve and Lance Parve. Photo by Bob Blazich.

African Adventure Steve Lettau 2018-08-13 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Aug 13, 2018

Our 2018-19 Rotary Youth Exchange student, Elisabeth Burschel from NW Germany is welcomed at our club meeting. Pictured from left: Bobby Fisher (Club President), Jennifer Sutherland (Community Service Chair) and Elisabeth Burschel. Photo by Bob Blazich.

Elisabeth at Rotary Steve Lettau 2018-08-13 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Jul 31, 2018

We are excited to announce that our district will be presenting One Rotary Summits again this fall!

One Rotary Summit is training for all Rotarians on the synergy among Membership, Public Image, and Humanitarian Service (The Rotary Foundation). Participants will exchange ideas and develop creative ways to achieve and sustain membership growth and retention, increase Rotary Foundation giving and project engagement, and gain enhanced public image in their communities. Rotarians are welcome to attend any session in the district.

Who? All Rotarians are invited and encouraged to attend

What? District 6270 One Rotary Summit (ORS) 2018

When? And Where?

  • Thursday, August 9 | 5:30 pm – 8:00 pm | Milwaukee Area Technical College - Oak Creek
  • Saturday, August 25 | 8:30 am – 12:00 pm |Location to be determined (Corrected)
  • Thursday, September 13 | 5:30 pm – 8:00 pm | LaSure’s Banquet Hall, Oshkosh
  • Saturday, September 22 | 8:30 am – 12:00 pm | Elkhorn High School (Corrected)
  • Thursday, October 11 | 5:30 pm – 8:00 pm | Milwaukee Area Technical College - Mequon
  • Saturday, October 27 | 8:30 am – 12:00 pm | Pine Hills Country Club, Sheboygan

Snacks and beverages will be provided.

Why? Return to your club with tools and ways to implement the "People of Action" public image campaign and this year's theme, "Be the Inspiration" while gaining a better understanding of how membership, public image, humanitarian service, and supporting your Rotary Foundation work together.

RSVP to Dana Kohlmeyer at dana.kohlmeyer@rotary6270.org. Please indicate your name, your club, which session you will attend, and if any special accommodations are needed.

Rotary D6270: Register for One Rotary Summit Steve Lettau 2018-07-31 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Jul 24, 2018
A giant artificial reef in the shape of a Rotary wheel restores marine life and protects the livelihood of several fishing villages in the Philippines

By Quincy Cahilig

In the calm blue waters of Lamon Bay lies a source of pride for local fishermen and a submerged salute to Rotary: an artificial reef in the shape of a Rotary wheel.

The wheel has helped restore the local fishing industry, which was devastated by large-scale commercial fishing vessels that used dynamite, cyanide, and fine mesh nets from the late 1990s through the early 2000s.

Reef Revisited Steve Lettau 2018-07-24 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Jul 20, 2018

Our guest speaker this morning was Ariam Kesete - Owner AK Development. Ariam has always remained connected to her communities and has been steadfast in her mission to better Milwaukee communities as evidenced by her direct engagement with a number of underserved communities in Milwaukee. Photo by Bob Blazich.

Improving Milwaukee communities Steve Lettau 2018-07-20 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Jul 20, 2018

Once again we are planning to prepare meals for Advocates of Ozaukee, the domestic violence shelter serving our county.  It will be followed by a cookout for our members and families.  It is scheduled for Thursday evening August 23rd at River Barn Park from 5:30 to7:30.  Representatives from Advocates will be joining us.  

This will also be a wonderful opportunity for us to welcome Elisabeth our Rotary Exchange Student.

Questions? Contact Lynn Streeter at lynn.streeter@froedtert.com.

Save The Date Steve Lettau 2018-07-20 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Jul 19, 2018

Lynn Streeter presents Matthew Ceelen with a check from MT Sunrise Rotary to support his Eagle Scout project of building two bat houses to be placed in the Mequon Nature Preserve.

Matt was diagnosed with bone cancer just weeks shy of his 15th birthday.  In medical terms it is a high grade sclerosing subtype of osteosarcoma.  Approximately 450 children in North America are diagnosed with osteosarcoma each year.  He is 1 of approximately 4 children who will be diagnosed with his subtype of osteosarcoma in 2017. 

A GoFundMe site has been set-up to cover some of the out-of-pocket expenses not covered by insurance. The site goal of $40,000 represents less than 20% of anticipated non-covered costs. As of this article, 203 people have donated $34,560.

To read more about Matt or to donate, please visit his GoFundMe page.

Thank You MT Sunrise Rotary! Steve Lettau 2018-07-19 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Jul 17, 2018

Chiara, our Rotary Exchange Student, receives a warm welcome home in Slovakia after spending a year in the US.

Editors Note: Check out mtsunriserotary.org for more photos of Chiara's homecoming.

Welcome Home Chiara Steve Lettau 2018-07-17 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Jul 10, 2018

Our Rotary exchange student, Elisabeth Burschel, arrives on August 5th from Germany! I've started to put together a welcome basket for her on behalf of our Rotary Club. I'm reaching out to see if you'd like to contribute to it. I have yogurt raisins and popcorn in it so far. I am looking for the following items:

  • Hair ties
  • Nail polish
  • Tea of all kinds (this is what she likes to drink the most)
  • Reusable water bottle
  • Healthy snacks like dried fruit, raisins, etc. She does not, however, like nuts of any kind.
  • Razors  (and all other personal toiletries)
  • Blank cards & envelopes for writing home
  • Lip gloss/chapstick
  • Gum, mints, candy (gummy bears are her favorite), chocolate, etc.
  • Gift cards to local places like Starbucks, Culver's, McDonald's, Target, etc.
  • iTunes gift cards
  • Body wash & lotion (she likes flowery scents)
  • Any other items a 16 year old girl would find useful or enjoyable for her visit to the USA!

Perhaps you might already have some of these items at your house, or feel free to pick up something small on your next shopping trip. I'll collect items (or money if you prefer) at our Friday Rotary meeting the next 3 weeks.

Additionally, I'll be sending out another plea shortly for Rotarians to take Elisabeth out/participate in family activities throughout the month of August and beyond. Please contact me with any dates in particular that you have in mind so I can add that to her schedule.

Thanks!

Jennifer
Email: jsutherland@newcastleplace.com

 
Jennifer needs your help! Steve Lettau 2018-07-10 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Jul 10, 2018

At last Friday's meeting Lynn Streeter introduced us to an exceptional young man by the name of Matthew Ceelen. Matt's story began with a letter to our club requesting financial support for his Eagle Scout project of building two bat houses to be placed in the Mequon Nature Preserve. With the request approved, we heard what Paul Harvey used to call "The rest of the story".

Matthew was diagnosed with bone cancer just weeks shy of his 15th birthday.  In medical terms it is a high grade sclerosing subtype of osteosarcoma.  Approximately 450 children in North America are diagnosed with osteosarcoma each year.  He is 1 of approximately 4 children who will be diagnosed with his subtype of osteosarcoma in 2017. 

A GoFundMe site has been set-up to cover some of the out-of-pocket expenses not covered by insurance. The site goal of $40,000 represents less than 20% of anticipated non-covered costs. As of this article, 203 people have donated $34,560.

To read more about Matt or to donate, please visit his GoFundMe page.

Article Photo: Milwaukee Bucks star Giannis Antetokounmpo received some pregame assistance from Matthew Ceelen, a local teen fighting bone cancer. The brief interlude was enjoyed by hundreds of thousands of Twitter and Instagram followers of the Bucks and ESPN, which shared a short video posted to twitter. Read more ...

Keep Matthew Strong Steve Lettau 2018-07-10 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Jul 10, 2018

Will Jones - Mequon City Administrator provided a Mequon update at our meeting on Friday. Photo by Bob Blazich.

Mequon Update Steve Lettau 2018-07-10 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Jul 05, 2018

Since 1994, Gathering on the Green, a 501(c)(3) non profit, has grown to become one of Southeastern Wisconsin’s premier summer spots to enjoy the world class entertainment.

Set in scenic Mequon Rotary Park, the multiple day festival offers the opportunity to enjoy the best musical entertainment, local food trucks and beverages while gazing under the summer stars. Gathering on the Green’s vision is to serve our community by providing memorable experiences through top musical entertainment.

Our events allow us to support our Music Together program and the Gathering on the Green Scholarship Fund.

For details and tickets: Click Here

Gathering on the Green - July 13 & 14 Steve Lettau 2018-07-05 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Jul 05, 2018

(Editor's note. Cindy is just finishing her term as President of the MT Sunrise Rotary Club. Congratulations Cindy!)

By Rebecca Konya - Special to The Milwaukee Business Journal 

Jun 22, 2018, 1:00am

If you ask Cindy Shaffer, she’ll tell you she’s not in the real estate business – she’s in the people business.

“I’m creating places with meaning,” explains Shaffer, owner of Shaffer Development LLC.

One of the few female developers in the metropolitan Milwaukee area, and among the few large-scale developers active in Ozaukee County, Shaffer began construction on Spur 16, a 14-acre town center development in Mequon, in April. 

Named for the railroad spur originally on the site, Spur 16 is the next phase of the Mequon Town Center, a $15 million mixed-use development with restaurants, retail space and apartments at Mequon and Cedarburg Roads completed in 2015.

Shaffer, who spent her early career running a chain of Molly Maid franchises, said she has always loved real estate.

Women of Influence - Cindy Shaffer Steve Lettau 2018-07-05 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Jul 05, 2018

A princess, 3 prime ministers, and a former first lady join 25,000 in Toronto to celebrate Rotary’s good work and plan more of it

By Arnold R. Grahl and Geoff Johnson Photos by Alyce Henson

Toronto, the Capital of Nice, opened its arms this week to welcome 25,652 Rotarians from around the world, who came to Rotary’s annual convention looking for inspiration — and finding it.

Whether it was by seeing old friends in the hallways, making new connections in the House of Friendship, or listening to eloquent speakers at general sessions, attendees found plenty at the 109th Rotary International Convention to remind them of the fellowship that binds them and the diversity that Rotary embodies.

“Now, we are sisters forever,” said Rhonda Panczyk, of the Rotary Club of Rochester, Michigan, USA, after spotting and embracing Ijeoma Pearl Okoro, past governor of District 9141 (Nigeria). The two women had met at the West African Project Fair last year, partnered on an immunization drive, and kept in touch on Facebook.

Rotary 2018 Convention Wrap Steve Lettau 2018-07-05 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Jun 19, 2018

MT Sunrise Rotary Kayak/Canoe Event

Launch on Saturday, June 30, 2018 at 11:00 AM
Depart from Highway C Canoe Launch and paddle to Villa Grove Park
BBQ to follow at the Schlageter Residence
3827 W. Freistadt Road

Personal flotation device (life jacket) is mandatory
Optional donation to Team River Runner
Contact: Dan O'Connor, 262-573-2775

*****

We need a count on who would like to join the kayaking and attend the BBQ. If you are interested in kayaking but need a kayak let Dan know and we will see if we can supply kayaks for those who are interested. If you would like to just meet everyone after kayaking and enjoy a BBQ let us know and be at Dave’s house around 1:30 pm.

A RSVP is important so we can prepare for both kayaking and BBQ.

David Schlageter dschlag911@ iCloud.com

Dan O’Connor Daniel.oconnor@lpl.com

Kayak/Canoe Event Steve Lettau 2018-06-19 05:00:00Z 0
Flag Day - June 14 Steve Lettau 2018-06-14 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Jun 14, 2018

Designed to ease capacity constraints at Froedtert Hospital

By Lauren Anderson - BizTimes

The Froedtert & the Medical College of Wisconsin health network is planning a new small-scale “neighborhood hospital” across the street from its recently-opened health center on North Port Washington Road in Mequon.

The 17,000-square-foot hospital will include a seven-bed emergency department and eight inpatient beds. It’s planned for a parcel of vacant land on North Port Washington Road, directly across the street from the Froedtert & MCW Mequon Health Center at 11430 N. Port Washington Road.

Froedtert & the Medical College plan small-scale ‘neighborhood hospital’ in Mequon Steve Lettau 2018-06-14 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Jun 12, 2018

New members Beth Bauer (left) and Dr. Alexandra Solano (right) give their classification talks at last Friday's meeting. (Photos by Bob Blazich)

Classification Talks Steve Lettau 2018-06-12 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Jun 12, 2018

Congratulations to Chiara our Rotary Exchange Student on her graduation from Homestead High School. Pictured with Chiara are her host families. (Photo by Bob Blazich)

Congratulations Chiara Steve Lettau 2018-06-12 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Jun 07, 2018

By Ryan Stillwater, a member of the Visalia County Center Rotary, California, USA

On my walk to work on a recent morning, air crisp and clear after an overnight rainstorm, I walk past a man sitting on the street corner. I immediately recognize him as a former resident in our Life Change Academy, who left early on in the program. I nicknamed him Logan, due to his striking resemblance to one of my favorite X-Men comic book characters — with his muscular frame and prominent dark sideburns and stubble. This morning, he is angry and making loud threats against a man (not present) who had very personally wronged him. “Are you ok?” I ask. “No!” he screams, eyes fixed on an invisible enemy. I am standing with Wolverine – the enraged persona of the gentle man I had known.

I became a Christian at the age of 15 and was baptized in the Pacific Ocean a year later with blue-dyed hair and a head full of ambition to do great things. In the years that followed, I would travel to Vancouver, San Francisco, and what is now South Sudan. I saw remarkable (and terrible) things – hopeless drug addicts, prostitutes of all ages, and a desperate mother holding a sick infant miles from medical aid. I imagine these experiences contributed to my becoming a Rotarian at the age of 31.

Why you want to risk Steve Lettau 2018-06-07 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Jun 07, 2018

The Police and Fire Commission (PFC) invites members of the community to assist in planning for the City’s public safety future, by attending a community listening session at 6:00 P.M. on June 14, 2018 in City Hall.  The PFC is committed to hiring a new Police Chief to lead the City’s  Police Department, an agency built on service, respect, trust, and transparency, and certainly one that is responsive to the community it is privileged to serve.

The goal of the listening session is to provide the community with a public forum to ask questions or otherwise provide guidance directly to the City of Mequon PFC Commissioners, concerning the new Police Chief’s recruitment.  The PFC needs the community to provide feedback to assist and guide the Commission prior to beginning formal assessment of candidates for the Chief of Police position.

This public session will be open to community members to ask questions, share concerns and engage with Police and Fire Commissioners, the present Police Chief and other City Officials concerning the type of Police Chief and ultimately Police Department you want to see in Mequon’s future.

Police Chief Recruitment Public Listening Session Steve Lettau 2018-06-07 05:00:00Z 0
Care to guess London's favorite breakfast food? Steve Lettau 2018-06-01 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on May 31, 2018

 

Paint Cedarburg | June 3 – June 9, 2018

Join us in historic Cedarburg for the largest gathering of artists in Wisconsin. Meet and mingle with artists as they paint before your eyes! Enjoy a gallery exhibition and sale and take home a fresh work of art to add to your collection.

For more information: cedarburgartistsguild.com.

A Plein Air Event Steve Lettau 2018-05-31 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on May 31, 2018

Claire is the Director of Individual Giving for Special Olympics Wisconsin.

Special Olympics Wisconsin (SOWI) provides year-round sports training and competition in a variety of Olympic-type sports for children and adults with intellectual disabilities, giving them continuing opportunities to develop physical fitness, demonstrate courage and experience joy while participating in a sharing of gifts, skills and friendship with their families, Special Olympics athletes and the community.

Claire Essman guest speaker Steve Lettau 2018-05-31 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on May 31, 2018

Our Rotary Youth Exchange student, Chiara, is graduating from Homestead next week, but she will not be able to attend her graduation ceremony.  She is taking the Rotary West Cost Trip and leaves for California the day before her Homestead graduation.

Not to let a good chance for a party go by, several of us are hosting a Graduation Party for Chiara on the evening Thursday, June 7th.

Please bring your families to celebrate this milestone in Chiara's life as she wears her Cap & Gown. Bob and Jan Blazich's, 317 West Street, Thiensville WI. Please RSVP to rblazich@gmail.com.

Congratulations Chiara Steve Lettau 2018-05-31 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on May 24, 2018

Dear Rotary Friends,

I'd like to invite you to a vocal recital our daughter, Cecilia, will be performing in support of the scholars at St. Marcus School, whereshe work on the Mission Advancement Team. The recital is on Sunday, June 24, 2:00 at St. Marcus church in Milwaukee. She’ll be singing an eclectic mix of songs, arias and spirituals, with a special guest appearance by one superstar singin' scholars. :)  she will be joined by spectacular artists Amanda Draheim, piano; Dr. Wallace Cheatham, piano; and Jeff Krumbein, organ.  She promises a charming, joyful, accessible, friendly and warm hour of music to lift you! 

For this recital, there will be a suggested donation of $10, or any amount of your choosing if you might be inclined! There will be an opportunity for a free will offering at the recital, or you can follow this link to make a contribution online: Melodies for a Mission. If you're unable to join her at the recital, She humbly invites you to consider a contribution in lieu of attending. 

I hope you can join us!

Thank You

Lucia Francis

Melodies for a Mission Steve Lettau 2018-05-24 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on May 24, 2018

Amanda Didier, MS, CSW - Executive Director of the Child Advocacy Center for Ozaukee County was our guest speaker at a recent club meeting. Photo by Bob Blazich.

Guest Speaker Steve Lettau 2018-05-24 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on May 24, 2018

Thanks to our club members and friends who made this possible.

Saturday 19 May was a wild success! We really promoted this event and we generated 115 volunteers, put a total of 628 plants in the ground and mulched them all ... 450 native trees and 178 native shrubs. Besides Rotarians volunteers were from, Homestead HS Football, Baseball & Interact,(thanks to Matt Wolf) community volunteers, Boy Scouts and Ozaukee Land Trust.

The Rotarians who participated registered on Saturday are: Bob Blazich, Beth Bauer, Lucia Francis, Tim Hamilton, Mike Kim, Dave Kliber, Brian Monroe, Dan O'Connor, Connie Pukaite, Diana Raasch, Dave Schlageter, Alice Sedgwick, Cindy Shaffer, Elizabeth Suran, Jennifer Sutherland, Ryan Walsh, Bill Wandsnider, Matt Wolf, Sandy Custer, Stan Smith (TM Noon), Daniele Calasanzio (Amigos).

Tim, Mike, Dan, Dave, Elizabeth, Ryan and Bill made the day a family affair by bringing along significant others and children.

The City of Mequon has committed to plant an additional 5 or 6 balled & burlapped much larger trees sometime in the Fall. That's more than 10 times the challenge from our Rotary International President to plant a tree for each of our Rotary Club members. Hooray for the air quality of our community & globe!

Most of the planting was done before noon, and mulching was done by 1:30. Amazing! Please check out our MT Sunrise home page for some additional images.

Thanks,

Brian - D6270 Tree Planting Coordinator

Tree Planting a Wild Success Steve Lettau 2018-05-24 05:00:00Z 0
Memorial Day - Remember & Honor Steve Lettau 2018-05-24 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on May 21, 2018

Congratulations Rotarians, and special thanks to Bill Wandsnider for hatching the redbud egg seven years ago. Photo by Bob Blazich.

Redbuds Steve Lettau 2018-05-21 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on May 17, 2018

By James Petersen

“When was the last time you did something for the first time? When was the first time you did something for the last time?” Those questions are tacked to the wall of my office. I have, at certain times in my life, received odd bits of wisdom; they all end up on the wall. A cartoon acquired at my first job depicts a sign on a muddy road warning: “Choose your rut carefully. You’ll be in it for the next 18 miles.” My editor had given it to me. When I would complain about a certain task, he would say: “How you deal with boredom may be the most defining of character traits.”

That became one of my core principles: One should always be on a learning curve. It helped that my job demanded discovery. As a writer, I explored new topics every month. The rut I chose lasted 40 years.

And then it disappeared.

Curve your enthusiasm - The joy of steering your interests toward something completely different Steve Lettau 2018-05-17 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on May 11, 2018

Dr. Alexandra Solano and Beth Bauer welcomed as new members at our weekly meeting. From left: JoAnne Vetter, Lucia Francis, Dr. Alexandra Solano, Beth Bauer, Brian Monroe, Cindy Shaffer (club President) and Terry Schacht.

Welcome to MT Sunrise Rotary! Steve Lettau 2018-05-11 05:00:00Z 0
Volunteers Needed Steve Lettau 2018-05-10 05:00:00Z 0
Cindy Shaffer and Chuck Zamora supporting The Ronald McDonald House Steve Lettau 2018-05-10 05:00:00Z 0
Check Out The Cool Events on Our Club Calendar Steve Lettau 2018-05-10 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on May 10, 2018

By Chris Offer, Rotary Club of Ladner, Delta, British Columbia, Canada (District 5040)

I was recently at a Rotary conference in Karachi, Pakistan. One session was a series of short presentations on club service projects. Most of the presentations were in Urdu, which I don’t speak. Fortunately, several speakers had very good slide presentations. I could understand the presentations. Photos of children at computer terminals with smiles or women at a clinic told me about the projects. I missed details but not the main ideas.

When photographs are used, they tell better Rotary stories. More photographs are being taken today than at any other time. Photos can show the impact of your club’s work, reach a wide audience outside of Rotary, and describe the lives we change.

Do

When telling a Rotary story, you can express more with a photo that shows action. Show the children and people who benefit from Rotary service. Make photos of them involved in the project. Avoid photos that present a stereotype of Rotary or of people. Your photos should show the diversity of your club and your community.

Don’t

A common Rotary photo is the “big check” presentation. I am sure every week in my local newspaper there is a charity big check photo. It is good to tell the community about the funds Rotary donates to other groups. But I think we can do it in a more exciting way.

Pictures on social media and the newspaper need to tell a story and be appealing to make you stop and read more. Posed people shaking hands over a big check presentation, smiling in front of a Rotary banner isn’t enough. The big check is focused on dollars, not on what those dollars do.

Step away from the oversize check photo and make your fundraising story more interesting. As the donor of money, Rotary can say thank you and recognise the effort made in more creative ways. If children are involved, present the check to them. Have people hold up the numbers to show the donation and involve the recipients of the funds not just the managers of the organization. Children holding a sign saying thank you or hanging upside down from a playground swing is more appealing than the cliché big check shot.

Be creative in the photos you use to show Rotary as People of Action.

No checks please! Better photos tell better stories Steve Lettau 2018-05-10 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on May 03, 2018

Emerging cancer therapy shows promise at Froedtert & Medical College of Wisconsin

By Lauren Anderson - BizTimes

The symptoms started out as mild stomach issues for Appleton resident Bret Carroll.

But when Carroll, a healthy and active 45-year-old professional pilot, found a lump on his abdomen in 2011, it signaled an enlarged spleen.

“They went through a process of doing CAT scans and blood work,” Carroll said. “They started narrowing a diagnosis down, and they kept eliminating the more benign options.”

Then all options were eliminated but one: mantle cell lymphoma, a rare cancer of the immune system. Carroll reported immediately to his first chemotherapy treatment and was given a prognosis of about two years.

“There was a pamphlet they gave us and it specifically mentioned that mantle cell was incurable,” Carroll said. “So it struck even harder than a diagnosis of cancer.”

A father of three high school students, Carroll considered what he wouldn’t live to see.

“It seemed like there were a lot of things we were going to miss out on that we still wanted to do,” he said. “The thought of not being able to see them graduate, it was very tough.”

Because he was in otherwise good health, doctors advised Carroll to pursue the most aggressive treatments available, with the promise that others would become available over time.

The next few years brought the highs and lows of treatment – the hopes and letdown of chemotherapy, stem cell transplants, radiation therapy and a clinical trial of a new drug that ended up producing extremely negative side effects, including severe weight loss.

With each roadblock, Carroll held out hope for what doctors initially told him – that new treatment options were coming.

“With the ups and downs over the years, it was disappointing to have setbacks, but it wasn’t like the initial shock of being diagnosed,” he said. “Even though the treatments themselves were a hardship, there was something to keep me going.”

‘Survivorship is the goal’ Steve Lettau 2018-05-03 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Apr 26, 2018

By By Joe Queenan

A few years ago, when I was suffering from severe back pain, I consulted a local chiropractor, a practitioner of a medical technique I do not actually believe in. After several predictably fruitless visits, she asked me to lie on a long, vibrating bed that would help me relax by putting my body in harmony with the vibrations of the planet.

“That won’t work with me,” I told her, gathering up my things. “I’m from Philadelphia.”

As an alumnus of the Quaker City working class, I held on to my disdain for all things esoteric and mystical and Eastern – yoga, tai chi, transcendental meditation, chutney – for many years until my back pain got so severe that I finally broke down and saw an acupuncturist. I would never have dreamed of doing this were it not for the intervention of a friend, a man as conservative and straitlaced as they come, who handed me Dr. Lee’s card, recommending him most highly.

“Wait a minute,” I objected. “Guys like you don’t believe in stuff like acupuncture.”

“If your back hurts enough, you’ll believe in anything,” he replied.

The treatment worked; for me, it was a miraculous cure. I am not exaggerating by saying that acupuncture saved my life. This got me to thinking about how hard it is to get a person to change his mind about something unless some sort of personal crisis erupts. 

Neuro-logic - How your brain is keeping you from changing your mind Steve Lettau 2018-04-26 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Apr 26, 2018

Our weekly meeting on Friday, April 27 will be at St. Marcus School 2215 North Palmer Street, Milwaukee WI 53212.

Our meeting will run from our regular time of 7-8am. A tour of the school will be given shortly after our meeting concludes by Superintendent Henry Tyson. School starts around that time so we should be able to stop in the classrooms and see the students in action.

Transportation: Those wishing to car pool should meet at Newcastle Place around 6:00 AM and plan to leave at 6:15 AM.

Parking: Ample street parking is available surrounding the school. There is also a small parking lot situated at the northwest corner of 1st Street and Garfield Avenue.

School Access: Enter the school at Door #17, located at 2210 N. 1st Street. Cecilia Davis will be stationed at this entrance to welcome and direct Sunrise members to the meeting room.

Questions? Contact Danielle Deller at danielle.deller@gmail.com.

Road Trip! Steve Lettau 2018-04-26 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Apr 25, 2018

Meeting Location Change

Our next meeting will be Friday (4/27) at
St. Marcus School, 2215 North Palmer Street, Milwaukee WI 53212.
See "Road Trip" article below for details.

One Time Location Change Steve Lettau 2018-04-25 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Apr 24, 2018

Click image above for more information or to register!

District 6270 COG Dinner Steve Lettau 2018-04-24 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Apr 23, 2018

Kate Hoffmann – Director of Donor Development at the Feith Family Ozaukee YMCA and Aaron Schmidt -  District Executive for the Kettle Moraine YMCA were our guest speakers at  Friday's club meeting. Photo by Bob Blazich.

The Y is Working Toward a Better Us Steve Lettau 2018-04-23 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Apr 19, 2018

By Yannis Comino

Over my summer break at the University of Newcastle in New South Wales, I decided to trade in the warmer weather of Australia for an English winter. Why, you might ask, would I do such a thing? Well, the only way I can explain it is — I was presented with the opportunity of a lifetime. During my New Generations Service Exchange at the headquarters of ShelterBox International in Truro, Cornwall, I gained priceless insight and first-hand experience in disaster relief management.

Both my mother and father are members of the Rotary Club of Morisset, and their club’s constant promotion of ShelterBox gave me the idea to seek the exchange. I am currently working on a bachelor’s in Development Studies with the hope of pursuing a career in the aid sector through either community development or disaster management, so I was thrilled when my exchange was approved.

Unexpected lessons from my disaster relief experience Steve Lettau 2018-04-19 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Apr 17, 2018

Where were you born, education/degrees or associations/board seats? I was born in Chicago, but moved to Wisconsin when I was two- so I am a Packers fan, but have a soft spot for the Bears. I earned a BA in Biological Psychology from CU-Boulder and an MBA in Product and Brand Management from UWM.

What did you want to be when you grew up? Sports Medicine physician.

Name of company & position, or your very first job: Advanced Ear, Nose & Throat Specialists (ADVENT), Provider & Community Outreach Coordinator.

Family: My husband, Mike, owns his own electrical contracting business. My son, Harrison, is 11, has developed a fantastic appreciation of sarcasm, and loves playing just about any and every sport, but is most passionate about soccer- he wants to be the next Lionel Messi. My daughter, Emme, is 9.5 and the sweetest, smartest, sparkle and tutu-loving old soul you’ll ever meet- she’s informed NASA that she will be working there as an astrogeologist. My daughter, McKenna (known as Smoosh to most), is 8, impossibly loving, and easily the funniest person I’ve ever met- she’s still planning to be a “hair doer,” but I can only see her on Second City.

Interests/hobbies/last book read/favorite movie/what’s playing in on your car’s stereo/pastimes: Event planning is part of my role within ADVENT and last night was our second annual State of the Union meeting. One item I was tasked with for the event was creating an upbeat playlist which turned out really well and is presently being played in my car. And may lead to some dancing while driving…

Biggest career accomplishment/highlight to date, or what do you like best about your job? The biggest career highlight for me was last summer when ADVENT was recognized as the second fastest growing business in Milwaukee by the Milwaukee Business Journal and I was asked to not only accept the award on ADVENT’s behalf, but also represent ADVENT in the brief interview they do with the top two businesses.

Member Spotlight - Allie Gerschke Kinney Steve Lettau 2018-04-17 05:00:00Z 0
Club meeting features COPE Executive Director Steve Lettau 2018-04-13 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Apr 12, 2018

St. Marcus School is the education ministry of St. Marcus Ministries. It serves approximately 700 students in K4 through 8th grade at its Main Campus on Palmer Street, and 220 students in K3 through 3rd grade at its North Campus on Richards Street.

St. Marcus’ vision is to be the best, urban Christian school in America. Through expansion, partnership and collaboration, St. Marcus is boldly committed to pursuing opportunities to serve as a catalyst for school reform and community-wide transformation. Working to ensure that every family has access to high-quality education in the city of Milwaukee.

Students, parents and teachers sign a covenant in which they commit to "do everything in their power to ensure academic success." St. Marcus believes there is no excuse for failure, and through Christ, nothing is impossible. The mantra I AM THIRD pervades the halls and classrooms. It summarizes the belief that students and teachers put the needs of others before their own, serving the Lord first, others second and themselves last.

St. Marcus believes students who enter the school can and will earn the right to post-secondary education. The school’s philosophical and practical approaches to education make this possible.

St. Marcus School Steve Lettau 2018-04-12 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Apr 10, 2018

Rotarians & Community Leaders Program: Peacebuilding Through Education & Literacy

Rotary International President Ian Riseley is hosting six Presidential Peacebuilding Conferences around the world in 2018.  Chicago is the only site for the U.S. based Peacebuilding Conference focused on Peace through Education and Literacy.  The Peacebuilding Conference in Chicago will highlight the many opportunities we all have to build peace through education and literacy locally and globally.

Attend to BE INSPIRED - FORM PARTNERSHIPS - AND TAKE ACTION!

Plenary and breakout session speakers include Ian Riseley, President, Rotary International, Robert Knuepfer, Rotary International Director, Mary Beth Growney Selene, Rotary Foundation Trustee and Past Rotary International Director, plus several Rotary Peace Fellows, Civil Rights and State Department representatives, and NGO leaders.

Cost for Rotarians and guests is $175 (until May 7); $195 (May 8 or later) and includes breakfast, lunch, and breaks.

If you would be interested in busing down with other District 6270 Rotarians, please contact Nancy Rhodes before May 1st at nancyrhodes1@outlook.com . (Cost for bus will depend on number of participants.)

​Or, make it a Rotary Weekend! On Friday, Chicago  Rotarians will host visits to RI Headquarters, the Paul Harris home, and other historic Rotary sites. For overnight guests, the Hilton Orrington Hotel is offering rooms at the reduced rate of $189 plus tax plus $13 for parking.

D6270: Presidential Peacebuilding Conference Saturday June 2 Steve Lettau 2018-04-10 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Apr 06, 2018

Christine Bohn takes questions during her presentation on the Ozaukee Washington Land Trust's work at Pukaite Woods in Rotary Park. Photo by Bob Blazich.

Ozaukee Washington Land Trust Presentation Steve Lettau 2018-04-06 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Apr 06, 2018

Gale Leonhardt receives a standing ovation during Friday's meeting as she accepts a Paul Harris award for her husband Bob Leonhardt who passed away in August of 2017. Photo by Bob Blazich.

Gale Leonhardt accepts Paul Harris award Steve Lettau 2018-04-06 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Apr 05, 2018

Chiara Mudrochova, our Rotary Youth Exchange Student, presents a tour of her home country at last Friday's meeting. Photo by Bob Blazich.

Welcome to Slovakia Steve Lettau 2018-04-05 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Apr 05, 2018

Club Secretary Fr. Mike Shay welcomes future Rotarian London at last Friday's meeting. Photo by Bob Blazich.

Future Rotarian Welcomed Steve Lettau 2018-04-05 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Apr 05, 2018

By by Corrinne Hess (BizTimes)

Last summer, Bartolotta Restaurant Group LLC wanted to add a sign on the north side of its Mr. B’s-A Bartolotta Steakhouse in Mequon.

Doing so would have given the restaurant, at 11120 N. Cedarburg Road, more visibility and, according to Bartolotta, a level playing field with Café Hollander, located kitty-corner at Mequon Town Center.

However, the application did not meet the requirements of Mequon’s multiple-page signage ordinance and was denied by the city’s plan commission. So was the appeal that followed in the fall.

Instead, Bartolotta was allowed to put the “Mr. B’s” name on the sign for Riversite shopping center, where the restaurant is located.

Mequon has long been known for its strict development rules (like its signage ordinance), large homes and modest-sized commercial buildings. But now, the city has slowly begun to embrace the concept of mixed-use developments. 

The city’s first mixed-use, urban-style development, Mequon Town Center, was completed about two years ago in a district, also called Mequon Town Center, that city officials had planned for several years. Now, two more projects are planned to complete the town center district: Spur 16 and Foxtown.

Mequon offers unique challenges and opportunities for real estate developers. Maintaining some of the strictest design and development rules in the region, Mequon has earned a reputation as one of the most difficult places in the area to do business. But at the same time, Mequon is also one of the most affluent communities in the state, making it a desirable location for both residential and commercial developers.

Mixed-use, but still Mequon Steve Lettau 2018-04-05 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Mar 29, 2018

Lance Parve - Sr. Project Engineer DOT and MT Sunrise Rotary club member talks about the work he and his wife Julie have done around the world in the cause of clean water and sanitation at a recent club meeting. Photo by Bob Blazich.

Friday's Speaker Steve Lettau 2018-03-29 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Mar 29, 2018

February 3 - April 8, 2018

Every two years the Museum of Wisconsin Art is privileged to showcase the most compelling, engaging, inventive, and unique art from a state rich in creative capital. The 2018 Wisconsin Artists Biennial features 53 works by 46 artists hailing from throughout the state, representing a wide spectrum of media and creative perspectives.

Venue: Museum of Wisconsin Art, 205 Veterans Ave., West Bend, WI 53095. 262-334-9638 (Phone)

2018 Wisconsin Artists Biennial at MOWA Steve Lettau 2018-03-29 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Mar 22, 2018

By Gabriel de Jesus Abade, former Rotary Youth Exchange Student

When I was 16, like most teenagers, I was focused on my own life. I hadn’t really thought about joining a service club or dedicating myself to helping others. But that changed when a high school friend began talking to me about Rotary, and its local and global actions. I was captivated and wanted to learn more. So I took my first steps in Rotary as a member of the Interact Club of Lauro de Freitas. Through the club, I was able to contribute in small ways to changing my community for the better.

It was also there that I first came into contact with the Rotary Youth Exchange program through exchange students who lived in my district. It aroused something inside of me, and I felt an urge to also go away and experience something new. I took part in a youth exchange to Freeport, Bahamas, in District 6990 and it changed my life in so many ways I can’t explain. It is still shaping many of my current decisions. A lot of what I do today is related to the change I went through nine years ago. The exchange opened my eyes to a world bigger than my own neighborhood, city, state, and country. And there was no turning back.

Rotary’s amazing capacity to bring people together Steve Lettau 2018-03-22 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Mar 16, 2018

Dr. Andrew McGuire D.C. - The Wellness Way, takes questions during his presentation on Food Allergies, Nutrition and Hormone Imbalance at our Friday meeting.

Dr. Andrew is in the House Steve Lettau 2018-03-16 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Mar 15, 2018

By Tom Daykin, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

Locally owned Purple Door Ice Cream is expanding with a store at the new Mequon Public Market, it was announced Friday.

The store will be Purple Door's second retail location.

The Milwaukee company got started in 2011, making ice cream for such wholesale accounts as Sendik's Markets and Metro Market. It's owned by Lauren and Steve Schultz.

Purple Door opened a retail counter in 2012 in the Walker's Point neighborhood, at Clock Shadow Creamery, 138 W. Bruce St. It moved the retail operation just four blocks away, to 205 S. 2nd St., in 2014.

Milwaukee-based Purple Door Ice Cream expanding to future Mequon Public Market Steve Lettau 2018-03-15 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Mar 13, 2018

Chiara Mudrochova, this year's Rotary Youth Exchange student, recently moved to Bob and Jan Blazich's home in Thiensville.  

Unlike AFS where a student stays with one family for the entire school year, Rotary requires students to live with three families during their year abroad. Chiara's first host was Sunrise member Will Jones and family, and her second host was a friend of the Schlageters, Marge Keehn.

Chiara, who is from Slovakia, will be the MT Sunrise Rotary Club speaker on Friday, March 30th. She will share information that morning about her home country and her experiences here in the US.

Where in the world is Chiara? Steve Lettau 2018-03-13 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Mar 09, 2018

Andrea Jorgensen celebrates completion of her new member challenge list in record time.

Celebrate!!! Steve Lettau 2018-03-09 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Mar 09, 2018

Our own Dr. Bobby Fisher addresses our meeting Friday on Blood Circulation, Essential Oils and Chiropractic.

Staying Young for the First 100 Years Steve Lettau 2018-03-09 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Mar 08, 2018

As part of National Preparedness, The Mequon Police Department is encouraging residents to register their mobile telephones to receive emergency alerts from the department.

The Mequon 911 Dispatch Center will use the “Hyper-Reach” emergency telephone notification system. “Hyper-Reach” allows the 911 Center to quickly send a recorded message to telephones in specific areas and alert residents to any emergency situations that may require immediate action. The system is designed to deliver more than 5,000 calls per hour and has been successfully used on a number of occasions for incidents such as hazardous chemical releases, missing persons and severe weather alerts. The “Hyper-Reach” message delivers critical information to residents and provides guidance on what precautions need to be taken by residents during and after the incident.

Hyper-Reach: Emergency Notification System Steve Lettau 2018-03-08 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Mar 02, 2018

Geoff Morgan shared his classification talk with club members at this Fridays meeting.

Meet Geoff Morgan Steve Lettau 2018-03-02 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Mar 01, 2018

ByBrett Morey, chair of Surfers Unite Rotarian Fellowship and past president of the Rotary Club of La Jolla Golden Triangle, California, USA

Have you ever thought of turning a hobby or passion into something even more beneficial through Rotary? I am a third generation Californian and grew up bodyboarding at Huntington Beach and Del Mar, before starting to surf 34 years ago. Back in May, I got this crazy idea to do something with my interest in surfing.

For years, we’ve all heard Rotary leaders talk about making Rotary fun, bringing youth into Rotary, and pushing our membership beyond 1.2 million members worldwide. It struck me, why not create a Rotary Fellowship that generates exciting activities and involves those we mentor through Youth Service programs? If there’s one thing I’ve learned as a member of Rotary, it’s that anything is possible.

SURF’s up: Who says Rotary can’t be fun? Steve Lettau 2018-03-01 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Feb 28, 2018

We’ve selected Thursday 15 March for our next new member orientation, fondly referred to as our “Fireside Chat”. You know from past events that this is a relaxed and casual event. This upcoming Fireside will be at JoAnn’s RE/MAX office at 1339 W. Mequon Rd. We’ll start at 5:30pm and wrap up around 7:00pm.

This orientation will provide a brief history about Rotary and our club. It will provide an open platform for us to answer new members' questions and help them on their Rotary journey with us.

We’ll provide light snacks and beverages. This informative event is open to all members, spouses, significant others, and potential members. For planning purposes please let me know if you will be able to join us. 

Brian Monroe
monroe.earthbound@gmail.com

Next Fireside Chat Scheduled Steve Lettau 2018-02-28 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Feb 20, 2018

Welcome to
Rotary Tri-Con 2018

May 4 - 6
Glacier Canyon Conference Center at the Wilderness  
45 Hillman Road, Wisconsin Dells, WI 53965

Tri-Con 2018 Steve Lettau 2018-02-20 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Feb 20, 2018

April 11, 2018 and April 12, 2018

Milwaukee Area Technical College - Downtown Campus
700 W. State St.
Milwaukee, WI 53233

The 15th Annual Sustainability Summit & Exposition will highlight economic trends and business opportunities in energy, water, infrastructure, transportation and workforce development. We encompass a broad range of systems and practices that will sustain the Earth’s resources for future generations. Our goal is to raise awareness of the historic opportunities propelled by the new economic wave of sustainability systems and practices—for investment, development, education and employment. A special emphasis will be placed on examples of successful programs and initiatives.

How can you help?

  1. Assist with Exhibit Table focusing on Rotary and its support for Sustainability.   Contact:  DG Jeff Reed, 920.517.1250  or  jreed6270@gmail.com
  2. Attend the Sustainability Summit.  Register at:  https://sustainabilitysummit.us/   Encourage peers (business leaders, organization leaders, Rotarians) and students to attend. 
  3. Become a Rotary Club Sponsor of the Sustainability Summit.  https://sustainabilitysummit.us/sponsor/

I have been working to ensure that Rotary will be involved in at least two breakout sessions –

  1. Environmental Sustainability Rotarian Action Group (ESRAG).  Discussion of ways in which Rotarians work to support sustainability.  (Contact:  D6270 DG Tina Hall)
  2. Grant Guidelines.  Rotary global projects must ensure sustainability.  The new RI needs assessment strengthens the approach and assurance of long-term progress.   (Contact: DGN Steen Sanderhoff)

Please let me know if you have any questions.

Yours in Rotary Service,

Jeff

Jeffrey G. Reed
District Governor

Moving Toward a Sustainable Economy Steve Lettau 2018-02-20 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Feb 15, 2018

By Albert Essien, Rotary Club of Tema Meridian, Ghana

Fante Mayera is a medium-size rural community of about 800 people in the greater Accra region of Ghana. In August, I visited the community with the manager of the Rotary-USAID partnership in Ghana and other officials to meet with villagers and check on the progress of a borehole and latrine. I had been part of an initial visit with my Rotary club in 2016 to assess conditions there, and it was exciting to return and see the difference this important collaboration is making.

The main occupation of the people in Fante Mayera is farming. The community is connected to the National Electricity Grid so inhabitants have access to a power supply. The community had an existing hand-dug well, which was installed a decade ago. But over time, the quality of the water had become very bad. When we arrived at the well site, the apron was hanging off from erosion and the hand pump was not working. To fetch water, villagers had to use a bucket and rope. The color of the water resembled tea.

Clean water for Fante Mayera, Ghana Steve Lettau 2018-02-15 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Feb 09, 2018

Geoff Morgan is welcomed as our newest member at our weekly meeting. Pictured from left Brian Monroe, Geoff Morgan and Cindy Schaffer club President.

Geoff Morgan welcomed as our newest member Steve Lettau 2018-02-09 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Feb 08, 2018

By Fred Mesquita, Rotary Club of São Paulo-Jardim das Bandeiras, São Paulo, Brazil

Two brothers, a car, one important social cause, a lot of courage, and many adventures along the way. That’s how our Expedition “Me Leva Junto” (Take me with you) began in October 2015, now more commonly known as the “Hepatitis Zero Expedition.”

My brother José Eduardo and I completed the first stage of our expedition, the Americas, in December, traveling through 20 countries and visiting 274 cities on the American continent. All our efforts are volunteer; there is no sponsorship from any company or organization.

Two brothers take aim at eliminating hepatitis Steve Lettau 2018-02-08 06:00:00Z 0
Breakfast with the Easter Bunny Steve Lettau 2018-02-08 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Feb 02, 2018

On Sunday, March 4th, COA Youth & Family Centers will roll out the red carpet for their 20th Annual Hollywood Gala. This "Oscars" event takes place downtown Milwaukee at the Hilton, and includes a formal dinner, one-of-a-kind silent auction and a live screening of the Academy Awards.

The event begins at 5:00 pm and ends at approximately 10:00 pm. Last year COA welcomed over 350 guests and raised $160,000 for their programs.

But such a large fundraising event wouldn't be possible without volunteers. 

Saturday, March 3rd, 10:00 am - 1:00 pm: Help load up items and boxes at COA's Administrative Office (909 E. North Ave) and then unload everything at Milwaukee Hilton City Center (509 W. Wisconsin Ave).

Sunday, March 4th, 9:00 am - 1:00 pm: Help set up the silent auction and dining rooms at the Milwaukee Hilton City Center (509 W. Wisconsin Ave).

Sunday, March 4th, 5:00 pm - 9:00 pm: Help greet guests, monitor the auction, sell raffle tickets, assist with registration and check-out etc.

If you can help at any of the times and places listed above please contact Jeff Kim at jtkim052810@gmail.com.

Volunteers Needed Steve Lettau 2018-02-02 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Feb 02, 2018

Joining us this morning from Homestead High School were Michael Mooren - Special Education Coordinator and Danielle Ozimek - Autism Specialist who spoke on our special education population, the types of jobs they are seeking and how they can be beneficial to employers.

Employment Opportunities for Students with Special Needs Steve Lettau 2018-02-02 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Feb 01, 2018

Do you feel a calling to serve others, but also lead through compassion and wisdom? Do you want to enrich lives, develop better organizations, and create a more positive world? You may be a servant-leader!

Join us to learn about and share your experiences servant leadership. Each month, in conjunction with Servant-Leader Milwaukee, Concordia University’s Center for Excellence in Learning and Teaching (CELT) and the Office of Alumni Relations host the Concordia Servant Leader Roundtable. The meetings are held the second Thursday of the month,  from 7:30 to 8:30 a.m. in the Lakeshore Room at the Mequon Campus. While the topic changes each month, the enduring theme of the roundtable is "the wisdom is in the room."

Servant Leader Roundtable Steve Lettau 2018-02-01 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Feb 01, 2018

By Bob Wallace, Rotary Coordinator for Zone 24 East and a member of the Rotary Club of Port Hope, Ontario, Canada

At our zone institute in Winnipeg, I saw a presentation about Rotary’s membership leads program and how districts are receiving many requests from the program but not following up on the leads.

Later, I was at Rotary headquarters in Evanston, Illinois, USA, for training as a Rotary Coordinator, and Brian King, RI Director of Membership Development, pointed out to us how failing to follow up on these leads represented a major public image failure. Think about it. A person makes contact with you, and you totally ignore them? What does that say about your organization?  In the business world, companies often make cold calls to generate business, sometimes with no results. In this case, people are coming to us asking to join.

People are asking to join, why are we ignoring them? Steve Lettau 2018-02-01 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Jan 25, 2018

In 1978, with the ink barely dry on his college diploma, Wally Sommer began working at his father's side in the family dealership, Sommer's Buick-Pontiac in Mequon. One of the early tasks handed to him by his dad was to call customers to check the status of outstanding accounts. Wally completed the job with one exception. The elder Mr. Sommer, Wally Sr., took the account back and said he would look into it himself. Later, Wally asked his father if he had reached a resolution regarding the customer.“Well, yes,” his father replied, it turns out the family doesn’t have any money to pay. In fact, they don’t even have money to fill their tank with heating oil this winter.” “What did you do?” asked his son. “Why I called the fuel company and ordered them to go to their home and fill the tank,” replied Wally Sr. The answer was not at all what young Wally expected to hear. But it established for him, at that early date, the foundation of care and respect the elder Mr. Sommer expected regarding the people with whom they did business. It’s a bar that Wally, his family and employees still hold as high today.

Customer care is but one of the reasons Wally Sommer of Sommer’s Subaru Buick GMC has been chosen as your 2018 Wisconsin Dealer of the Year and the 2018 Time Quality Dealer of the Year nominee.

Sommer’s Subaru, the store Wally is representing as your TIME Quality Dealer nominee, is operating at record levels. A beautiful new facility and a growing staff have allowed the dealership to maintain their #1 Rank in the Minneapolis zone of 44 dealers and #2 ranking in the Central Region of Subaru consist- ing of 163 retailers. For four consecutive years the dealership has been recognized as a member of the Subaru Chairman’s Roundtable consisting of the top 25 of 630 national dealers. The award is not based simply on sales volume but on facility requirements and customer satisfaction. In addition, the Buick- GMC franchises have earned GM’s Mark of Excellence from 2013 to the present. Those, however, are only numbers. The real story lies in the atmosphere of the Sommers dealership.

Sommer's Automotive Group named Wisconsin Dealer of the Year for 2018 Steve Lettau 2018-01-25 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Jan 19, 2018

Dr. Daniel Sem, Dean of Concordia’s Batterman School of Business shared some of what he knows about the “entrepreneurial mindset” and “learning business by doing it” during our weekly meeting. Photo by Bob Blazich.

School is in session! Steve Lettau 2018-01-19 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Jan 18, 2018

By Jeff Rumage, Now News Group

MEQUON - An interdisciplinary building at Concordia University Wisconsin has been downsized to 40,000 square feet, less than half the size proposed when the building was originally presented to city officials in October 2016.

The building is named the Robert W. Plaster Free Enterprise Center, in recognition of a gift made by the Robert W. Plaster Foundation intended to support Concordia's vision of promoting "free market principles across the disciplines of healthcare, education, science, technology and the arts."

The once-four-story building has been scaled down to a three-story, 46-foot-tall building. Cliff Mayer, principal of Mayer Helminiak Architects, told the Mequon Plan Commission on Jan. 15 that the building was scaled down to lower the cost of the project.

The commission unanimously approved the university's building and site plans at the meeting.

The building will still feature large glass windows overlooking Lake Michigan. The building will also have a two-story connection to Luther Hall on its north side. 

Concordia expects to begin construction in March and have the building ready for occupancy by January 2019.

The new facility will house classrooms, lecture halls and faculty offices for schools of business, education, hospitality, event management and health professions.

Concordia's top degree-seeking programs of study are in health care and business, so the university has needed space for those fields for some years, said Concordia University Wisconsin spokeswoman Kali Thiel. 

The building will also provide a physical space to build upon the collaboration that already exists between the health care and business schools, Thiel said.

Mequon OKs scaled-down Concordia building, half the size of the original proposal Steve Lettau 2018-01-18 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Jan 16, 2018

Will open to patients on Jan. 18

By Lauren Anderson - BizTimes

Froedtert & the Medical College of Wisconsin officials unveiled the health network’s new Drexel Town Square Health Center in Oak Creek on Wednesday evening.

The three-story, 109,000-square-foot health center at the corner of West Drexel Avenue and South Sixth Street includes primary care and urgent care services, an outpatient surgery center and a cancer center. It will begin seeing patients Jan. 18.

The Drexel Town Square Health Center marks an expansion of the health network’s presence south of Milwaukee.

Froedtert unveils new Drexel Town Square Health Center in Oak Creek Steve Lettau 2018-01-16 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Jan 12, 2018

Chuck Zamora, of Zamora Group International, shared insights gathered over two decades speaking to more than 93,000 students. (Photo by Bob Blazich)

Tools of Life and Leadership Steve Lettau 2018-01-12 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Jan 11, 2018

Chase your baseball dream

George “the Waterman” Lewis, Rotary Club of Lakewood Ranch, Fla. (Published in The Rotarian - January 2018)

When I was growing up, not many people thought about going to college. So in 1952, when I graduated from Rahway High School in New Jersey, I knew what I was going to do: sign a contract to play baseball. I had made the varsity team for the Rahway Indians my freshman year, and in my sophomore year we won three major New Jersey championships. I was All State my junior and senior year, and team captain in my senior year. I was feeling pretty good.

In those days there were no drafts, but scouts for the major league teams were going around and looking at high school players. I had become friendly with a scout for the Boston Red Sox, and I ended up signing with them. They sent me to upstate New York to play in the All Star College League. It was my first time ever on an airplane, and I found myself sitting next to another young guy. Like me, he was a catcher, and he had some impressive credentials. This worried me. He might get the starting job ahead of me. I thought, “How can I be on the bench? I’m the best baseball player in the world.” 

Things turned out differently than expected. In my first at-bat, I struck out on three pitches, and they sent me back home. I thought, “My life has ended.” I was practically crying.

George “the Waterman” Lewis, Rotary Club of Lakewood Ranch, FL Steve Lettau 2018-01-11 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Jan 11, 2018

By Don Behm - Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

The last unprotected reach of Trinity Creek close to its headwater springs in Mequon will be relieved of a recurring burden of soil and agricultural pollutants now that it has been acquired by the Mequon Nature Preserve.

To ensure the 6.38-acre property west of busy Wauwatosa Road is not developed in the future, the Milwaukee Metropolitan Sewerage District has proposed paying $50,000 to the nature preserve to create a permanent conservation easement on the property deed that prohibits subdivision and building construction.

Not to stop there, the easement would require restoration of native grasses and trees on the land.

The easement would allow one change to the landscape. The Mequon Nature Preserve could shift the flow of the creek through the roadside property out of a straightened agricultural drainage ditch and into a more natural, meandering channel, said David Grusznski, Milwaukee program manager for The Conservation Fund.

Partnership with Mequon Nature Preserve to prevent development of Trinity Creek floodplain Steve Lettau 2018-01-11 06:00:00Z 0
A Full House at Friday's Meeting Steve Lettau 2018-01-05 06:00:00Z 0
Milwaukee County Circuit Judge Our Guest Speaker Steve Lettau 2018-01-05 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Jan 04, 2018

Break the sound barrier (as a teacher for the deaf)

Jean Irwin Hatfield, Rotary Club of Folsom, CA (Published in The Rotarian - January 2018)

When I decided to become a teacher for the deaf, I enrolled in a program at Fresno State. We started with 80 candidates, but by graduation we were down to 13. That’s how intense the program was.

People don’t realize the linguistic challenges of deaf students, especially the trouble they have learning to read. Why is that? Because reading is a sound/symbol system. You don’t read with your eyes but with your ears. This is why blind students, for instance, read at the same level as their sighted peers, while deaf students might graduate from high school reading at a fourth-grade level.

When I started out, 38 years ago, teachers dealt with this problem using workarounds, trying to figure out how to get information to deaf students in ways that didn’t involve reading. Then I heard about a professor in England, David Wood, who was doing groundbreaking work with the deaf.

Jean Irwin Hatfield, Rotary Club of Folsom, CA Steve Lettau 2018-01-04 06:00:00Z 0
Online Version Steve Lettau 2018-01-04 06:00:00Z 0
Want to learn more about the causes we support? Check out these videos: Steve Lettau 2018-01-04 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Dec 28, 2017

On behalf of the Mission Advancement Team and St. Marcus School, I'm writing to thank your AMAZING Interact Team at Homestead for the book donation and the food & recipe package for one of our families!!

It was such a pleasure to meet David and the students last week. Our scholars had a BLAST opening the books in the library, and it was so delightful to watch their reactions as they unwrapped.

Later that week, we delivered gifts to the "Patricia P." family, one of the recipients in our Christmas Angels program. The Interact students' food and recipe package was a PERFECT match for Patricia!! She was absolutely overcome with gratitude.

We are so blessed to have connected with you this holiday season, and I hope it's just the beginning of an exciting partnership! I wish you and the Interact students blessings galore in the new year to come. THANK YOU and God bless!!

With much gratitude,

Cecilia Davis
Executive Assistant to the Director of Mission Advancement
St. Marcus Lutheran School

Editor's Note: View photos from this event at MTSunriseRotary.org.

Homestead Interact Club delivers 100 books to the kids at St. Marcus School Steve Lettau 2017-12-28 06:00:00Z 0
Happy Holidays from Chiara and friends Steve Lettau 2017-12-28 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Dec 28, 2017

By Joe Williams, Rotary Club of Durango Daybreak, Colorado, USA

Most people in the United States take electricity for granted. Only if a powerful storm hits and it is taken away do we get an understanding of what it is like to depend entirely on the sun for our light.

There is, however, a significant population in the heart of the United States that lives their lives with only the sun to light the way.

The Navajo Nation is large. Our club is located slightly north of the Nation. And so our project began.

Durango club brings the power of light Steve Lettau 2017-12-28 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Dec 28, 2017

By Joe Williams, Rotary Club of Durango Daybreak, Colorado, USA

Most people in the United States take electricity for granted. Only if a powerful storm hits and it is taken away do we get an understanding of what it is like to depend entirely on the sun for our light.

There is, however, a significant population in the heart of the United States that lives their lives with only the sun to light the way.

The Navajo Nation is large. Our club is located slightly north of the Nation. And so our project began.

Durango club brings the power of light Steve Lettau 2017-12-28 06:00:00Z 0
Happy New Year Steve Lettau 2017-12-28 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Dec 21, 2017

By Frank Bures Photos by Scott Slusher (The Rotarian)

At Doan’s Crossing, in a remote corner of Texas near the southeastern tip of the Panhandle, the local folks hold a picnic every May. It has all the things you would expect from a small-town picnic: A few hundred people from the nearby town of Vernon and the surrounding area gather to eat barbecue and socialize. Riders on horseback cross the river from Oklahoma to attend. A Picnic King and Queen are crowned. 

But the event, which claims to be the “oldest pioneer festival” in Texas, also marks a piece of American history that was nearly lost: Doan’s Crossing was a key point along the Great Western Trail, a major cattle trail that, during its 20 years of existence, was more heavily used than the better-remembered Chisholm Trail. While it was in use, some 6 million to 7 million cattle and a million horses made their way up various parts of the route.

 

Rotarians from three countries resurrect the forgotten Great Western Trail Steve Lettau 2017-12-21 06:00:00Z 0
MT Sunrise Rotary's 2017 Holiday Party Steve Lettau 2017-12-18 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Dec 14, 2017

Money Magazine identified 100 spots that offer a healthy economy, affordable homes, and a high quality of life. Mequon was named the 41st best place to live! Money Magazine Wrote:

"The community contains more than two dozen community parks, with hundreds of acres that are operated by the city or county. Early this year, Mequon opted to become a Bee City USA, and the city has partnered with the Mequon Nature Preserve to host events and underline the importance of bees. Mequon residents also enjoy access to five golf courses, the winding Milwaukee River, and a convenient commute to Milwaukee.

The local school system is ranked as one of the best in Wisconsin, with ultrahigh graduation rates. Mequon is also home to a number of higher education institutes, including Concordia University Wisconsin, the Wisconsin Lutheran Seminary, and the northern campus for the Milwaukee Area Technical College."

Mequon Ranked 41st Best Place to Live in America! Steve Lettau 2017-12-14 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Dec 11, 2017

Nicole Bulow Executive Director Big Brothers Big Sisters of Ozaukee County and Nathaniel were our guest speakers at Friday's club meeting. Big Brothers Big Sisters of Ozaukee (BBBSOZ) serves children, ages 5-17, needing and wanting a mentor within a community-based or school-based service area. Photo by Bob Blazich.

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Ozaukee County Steve Lettau 2017-12-11 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Dec 07, 2017

The holiday season brings with it a special opportunity to serve our community as opportunities become available that might not necessarily be around the rest of the year.

Our Rotary club has volunteered to spread some holiday cheer to a St. Marcus School family this year. All needs and wishes listed by the family have been divided up among our club and the interact club. Thank you to those of you who have already generously donated money, gifts, and other household items.

UPDATE: Gifts are now due by the morning of Friday, December 15th. Danielle Deller will be collecting items on Friday, December 8th and Friday December 15th. Gifts should be wrapped and labeled with the family member’s name. 

If you selected a specific gift from the basket that went around but are unable to obtain it by the deadline, please let Danielle (danielle.deller@gmail.com) know what it was and who it was for so she can ensure all members of the family are accounted for equally.

Happy Holidays!

 

Danielle
danielle.deller@gmail.com

Christmas Angels Program - St. Marcus School Steve Lettau 2017-12-07 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Dec 07, 2017

By José Lucas Rodríguez, governor of Rotary District 7000 (Puerto Rico)

Puerto Rico is an island in the Caribbean, the smallest of the Greater Antilles, which is distinguished by its natural beauties, the talent of Puerto Ricans in music, arts, and sports, and above all for the warmth of its people.

But the so-called island of Enchantment was transformed by what already has been classified as the most catastrophic event in the history not only of Puerto Rico, but of the United States. More than a month after Hurricane Maria hit Puerto Rico, our people are still struggling to recover from the impact of this natural phenomenon, which left so much desolation in its wake.

How Rotary is assisting recovery in Puerto Rico Steve Lettau 2017-12-07 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Dec 06, 2017

Rotary clubs of Southeastern Wisconsin (District 6270) will award one scholar a $30,000 Global Grant Scholarship (GGS) formerly known as a Rotary “Ambassadorial Scholarship” for matriculation Fall 2018. The purpose of the Global Grant Schlarship, a graduate-level study opportunity often outside the US, is to further international understanding and friendly relations among people of different countries and geographical areas, within one of Rotary’s six areas of focus.

Additionally, several Scholarly Stipends (SS) may be awarded throughout the year ($2-3000) to provide an opportunity for the applicant to:  travel to attend a conference to present an accepted paper, fund coursework, or fund a short-term volunteer opportunity, all within one of Rotary’s six areas of focus.

To learn more about the scholarships’ criteria, process, eligibility, etc. go to the Rotary District 6270 website or contact Rotary District 6270 Scholarship Chair, Karen Plunkett at 414-403-4878 or via. email at scholarshipchair@rotary6270.org.

Rotary: D6270: Scholarships Offered Steve Lettau 2017-12-06 06:00:00Z 0
Happy Holidays Steve Lettau 2017-11-30 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Nov 29, 2017
When you make a donation to The Rotary Foundation, you are helping Rotary members make a difference in the lives of millions of people around the world, by promoting peace, preventing disease, supporting education, bolstering economic development, and providing clean water and sanitation.
5 Reasons to support The Rotary Foundation Steve Lettau 2017-11-29 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Nov 22, 2017

Friday's action packed meeting included classification talks by new members Bruce Carter (top left) and Jeff Kim (top right). Bee Janssen is presented our first "Guest" classification badge by Fr. Mike Shay (club Secretary). Photos by Bob Blazich.

An action packed meeting Steve Lettau 2017-11-22 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Nov 22, 2017

By Readers Digest Editors

Some of the most moving lessons are taught by your students.

When Mrs. Klein told her first graders to draw a picture of something for which they were thankful, she thought how little these children, who lived in a deteriorating neighborhood, actually had to be thankful for. She knew that most of the class would draw pictures of turkeys or of bountifully laden Thanksgiving tables. That was what they believed was expected of them.

What took Mrs. Klein aback was Douglas’s picture. Douglas was so forlorn and likely to be found close in her shadow as they went outside for recess. Douglas’s drawing was simply this:

A hand, obviously, but whose hand? The class was captivated by his image. “I think it must be the hand of God that brings us food,” said one student.

“A farmer,” said another, “because they grow the turkeys.”

“It looks more like a policeman, and they protect us.” “I think,” said Lavinia, who was always so serious, “that it is supposed to be all the hands that help us, but Douglas could only draw one of them.”

Mrs. Klein had almost forgotten Douglas in her pleasure at finding the class so responsive. When she had the others at work on another project, she bent over his desk and asked whose hand it was.

Douglas mumbled, “It’s yours, Teacher.”

Then Mrs. Klein recalled that she had taken Douglas by the hand from time to time; she often did that with the children. But that it should have meant so much to Douglas …

Perhaps, she reflected, this was her Thanksgiving, and everybody’s Thanksgiving—not the material things given unto us, but the small ways that we give something to others.

This Teacher’s Story Will MAKE Your Thanksgiving Steve Lettau 2017-11-22 06:00:00Z 0
Happy Thanksgiving Steve Lettau 2017-11-22 06:00:00Z 0
Holiday Gift Wrap Fundraiser Steve Lettau 2017-11-16 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Nov 16, 2017

By Magdalena Zurita with Phill Gittins, Rotary Peace Fellows

My interest in promoting peace brought me to Bolivia, where I am doing my applied field study while earning a master’s degree at the Rotary Peace Center at International Christian University in Tokyo, Japan. I am passionate about the reduction of poverty and inequality, and efforts to address these challenges in ways that promote working together and embracing difference. In May, a Skype call and email exchange connected me to Phill Gittins, a fellow Rotary Peace Fellow, who has been working in Bolivia for many years. Through Rotary two strangers, working on peace separately, are now working on peace together.

Working together for peace through Rotary Steve Lettau 2017-11-16 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Nov 10, 2017

The Homestead High School Interact Club collected 760 pounds of food. The group with some help from sunrise rotary went and sorted the food at a family sharing. They got done early so they sorted another 1,000 pounds of food. Great job by the Interact Club all their own idea and execution!

Homestead HS Interact Group Leads Successful Food Drive Steve Lettau 2017-11-10 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Nov 10, 2017

Joy Tapper - Executive Director Milwaukee Health Care Partnership was our speaker Friday. The Milwaukee Health Care Partnership brings together health care providers, government agencies, and community organizations to develop and implement a plan for change for our most vulnerable populations.

Speaker Joy Tapper - Executive Director Milwaukee Health Care Partnership Steve Lettau 2017-11-10 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Nov 09, 2017

Earthquakes and emigration are draining the life out of rural communities. Rotarians are giving young people a reason to come back.

By Diana Schoberg Photos by Gianluca Cecere

Arquata del Tronto was never an easy place to live. Picturesque, yes: The snowcapped peak of Monte Vettore forms the backdrop to this collection of medieval villages sandwiched between two national parks in central Italy’s Appenine Mountains. Tiny chapels line the local trails, and one village is known as the land of the fairies, a mythological place where shepherds were lured in by beautiful fairies with goat feet. But the municipality, which includes 15 villages, had a population of 1,200, and the nearest city is 15 miles away along the narrow, winding mountain roads. For a young person, for a young family, there was not much reason to stay. And that was before the earthquakes hit.

Maurizio Paci explains all of this after he escorts us through an army checkpoint to view this community where he and his family have lived for generations, which  was reduced to rubble after three major  earthquakes hit central Italy in 2016. He experienced the tragedy up close: Here in Arquata, he has been on the municipal council for 11 years, while in nearby Amatrice, which was also pummeled during the disasters, he is a police officer. “I was hit on all sides,” he says.

Italy's Disappearing Villages Steve Lettau 2017-11-09 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Nov 09, 2017

Photo by Bob Blazich

AFS Talent Show Steve Lettau 2017-11-09 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Nov 09, 2017

M-T Sunrise Rotary welcomes Matthew Wolf, Jeff Kim, Bruce Carter and Ajay Singh as new members. Pictured from left: Bobby Fisher, Jeff Kim, Ajay Singh, Club President Cindy Shaffer, Brian Monroe, District Governor Jeff Reed, Mike Shay, Bruce Carter, Bob Blazich, Connie Pukaite and Matthew Wolf.

Four New Members Inducted Steve Lettau 2017-11-09 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Nov 02, 2017

By Jeff Rumage

MEQUON - A fire ravaged the Charter Manufacturing building on Glen Oak Lane, leaving the building with "very extensive damage," according to Mequon Fire Chief David Bialk.

“Early indications are that it is a total loss and that repair is not an option” said Charter Manufacturing spokesman Evan Zeppos.

The building houses administrative offices for nine employees, who have been relocated to neighboring Charter Manufacturing facilities within the business park.

The Mequon Fire Department received a fire alarm alert from the building at 9:12 p.m. Oct. 30, and the first truck was on the scene in 10 minutes. Firefighters attempted to enter the building, but due to the intensity of the fire, they switched to a defensive firefighting strategy on the outside of the building, Bialk said.

About 40 people responded to the scene from the Mequon, Thiensville, Grafton, Cedarburg and North Shore fire departments.

High winds fanned the flames, hampering firefighting efforts, Bialk said. Crews didn't leave the scene until 12:30 a.m., more than three hours after receiving the fire alarm call.

No one was in the building at the time of the fire, and no firefighters were injured. Bialk said the cause of the fire is under investigation, but nothing suspicious was found at the scene. Based on the fire damage to the roof, Bialk thinks the fire started above the first floor.

Charter Manufacturing building in Mequon 'a total loss' after fire Steve Lettau 2017-11-02 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Oct 26, 2017

LOTUS Legal Clinic serves victims of gender-based violence and human trafficking through trauma-informed legal advocacy, policy initiatives, education, and survivor empowerment.

For more information on the scourge of human trafficking and how LOTUS Legal Clinic and Rachel Monaco-Wilcox (recent featured speaker) are working with victims please click the image above.

LOTUS Legal Clinic Steve Lettau 2017-10-26 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Oct 26, 2017

By Andrew Gruman, Now News Group

For the past two seasons, the Homestead girls tennis team has not been stopped. 

The Highlanders capped their second consecutive WIAA Division 1 state team championship with a 5-2 victory over Neenah in the championship match Oct. 21 at Nielsen Tennis Stadium in Madison.

Homestead has now won seven team state girls tennis championships and have won in consecutive seasons for the first time since winning five straight from 2008-12. 

The win over Neenah (15-2) capped the Highlanders team record at 26-0, leaving Homestead at a perfect 53-0 over the past two seasons.

Back-to-back: Homestead girls tennis repeats as team state champions Steve Lettau 2017-10-26 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Oct 19, 2017

Thanks goes out to Milwaukee North Shore Rotarian Jerry Gold who coordinated this opportunity for three Rotary Clubs to come together and plant 107 trees and 96 shrubs in the Mequon Nature Preserve. We had  30 Rotarian volunteers representing 7 countries from 3 continents making this an international project. There were  6 were from Amigos de Milwaukee, 14 from MliwNS and our 10 included; John H, Tim H, Andrea J, Dave K, Kay N, Connie P, Dave S, Terry S, JoAnn V and myself.

The trees and shrubs were supplied moved into place by staff at Mequon Nature Preserve and some of the larger holes were pre-drilled for us. After we received planting instructions and equipment we were set loose to walk to the multiple planting sites and get planting. The Mequon Nature Preserve staff never thought that we’d get all of the trees and shrubs planted and mulching completed in one work day. The planting and mulching teams along with BBQ lunch provided the opportunity for members from the different clubs to get to know each other by working shoulder to shoulder and breaking bread together.

The three clubs have met their respective goals of one tree per member (49 for MT), but we’ll have multiple opportunities to exceed that goal. Mequon Nature Preserve will have 2,000 whips that will need to go in spring and another 800 trees and shrubs again next fall. Connie is also working on another tree planting project for this spring (details to follow).

Thanks, Brian
D6270 Tree Planting Coordinator 

Photo: Pre-planting group from L-R Brian M.(MT), Frey F.(A), Edwin N.(A), Jerry G.(NS), John H.(MT), Fessahaye  M.(A), Natraj S.(NS) Dave S.(MT)

MT Members Answering the One Tree Planted per Member Challenge Steve Lettau 2017-10-19 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Oct 19, 2017

September 30, 2017

A message to Rotarians in District 6270

The Rotary Foundation and Rotary clubs are helping communities battered by severe weather and earthquakes.  These disasters have caused major damage in the Golf Coast, southeast USA, the Caribbean and Mexico.  As you have heard on the news, Puerto Rico has been devastated. 

These disasters have resulted in loss of life, injury, and damage to homes, businesses, and the infrastructure needed for communities to operate. Many people have lost everything – shelter, clothing, food, even transportation.  In some communities there is no electricity, no water, and no fuel. Many organizations are mobilizing to assist. ShelterBox, our Rotary Partner, has been actively assisting. The Red Cross is responding. Some clubs in our district have already responded with contributions of money and tangible goods – thank you.

Rotary now has four donor advised funds to assist victims. We invite you to consider a donation to help neighbors as they rebuild their lives. As a Rotarian or a Rotary Club your donation can help. Recovery will be an ongoing effort for years. Here are several Rotary Foundation donor advised funds to which you can make your contribution:

  • Puerto Rico.  Puerto Rico Recovery.  Account # 614
  • Earthquake.  Mexico Earthquake Recovery Fund.  Account # 613
  • Hurricanes Irma and Maria.  Hurricane Emergency Relief Fund.  Account # 296
  • Hurricane Harvey.  Gulf Coast Disaster Relief Fund.  Account # 608

You can donate by check, credit card or wire transfer.

For more information, click here.

Thank you for your generosity.

 

Jeffrey G. Reed
District Governor 2017-18, District 6270, Rotary International

Disaster Relief Response Update Steve Lettau 2017-10-19 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Oct 19, 2017

Three local printmakers are sharing the Cedarburg Cultural Center's artist-in-residency in October. 

Jack Pachuta, Jewell Riano Bradley and Susan Steinhafel are all studio artists at Paul Yank’s Ozaukee Art Center. 

The three will join Yank in a monoprint/collagraph exhibit Oct. 19-Nov. 26. The opening reception is planned for Monday, Oct. 23. 

Pachuta takes a nontraditional approach. Combining printmaking techniques with craftsmanship of pencil and ink renderings, his works are known for their vibrant colors and unique textures.

Three printmakers in residence at Cedarburg Cultural Center in October Steve Lettau 2017-10-19 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Oct 12, 2017

Editors note: This is the third in a three part series on the structure of Rotary.

Rotary is made up of three parts:

  1. Rotary Clubs - Rotary clubs unite dedicated people to exchange ideas, build relationships, and take action.
  2. Rotary International - Rotary International supports Rotary clubs worldwide by coordinating global programs and initiatives.
  3. The Rotary Foundation - The Rotary Foundation helps fund our humanitarian activities, from local service projects to global initiatives.

Together, we work to make lasting change in our communities and around the world.

Rotary Foundation

The Rotary Foundation transforms your gifts into service projects that change lives both close to home and around the world.

During the past 100 years, the Foundation has spent $3 billion on life-changing, sustainable projects.

With your help, we can make lives better in your community and around the world.

Why should I donate to The Rotary Foundation?

Your donation makes a difference to those who need our help most. More than 90 percent of donations go directly to supporting our service projects around the world.

How does The Rotary Foundation use donations?

Our 35,000 clubs carry out sustainable service projects that support our six causes. With donations like yours, we’ve wiped out 99.9 percent of all polio cases. Your donation also trains future peacemakers, supports clean water, and strengthens local economies.

What impact can one donation have?

It can save a life. A child can be protected from polio with as little as 60 cents. Our partners make your donation go even further. For every $1 Rotary commits to polio eradication, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation has committed $2.

Rotary Clubs Steve Lettau 2017-10-12 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Oct 12, 2017

Homestead High School had their homecoming this past weekend. Our Rotary youth exchange student, Chiara, spoke with AFS at the pep rally in front of the entire school, marched with AFS in the parade and went to dinner and the dance.

Chiara Participates in Homestead Homecoming Steve Lettau 2017-10-12 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Oct 12, 2017

MEQUON - A new, 92,000-square-foot medical center will open Oct. 19. 
By Tyler Langan, Now News Group

The Froedtert Health and the Medical College of Wisconsin Mequon Medical Center, 11430 N. Port Washington Road, will focus on "digital health care," including virtual consultations and "e-visits" with medical professionals, according to a news release.

Services at the new center include urgent care, primary care, women’s health and obstetrics/gynecology services. Specialty care will include endocrinology, orthopedics, sports medicine, spine care, physical, occupational and speech therapy, podiatry and pain management.

It also will include a 15,000-square-foot sports performance and training facility, with a focus on orthopedics.

Screening and imaging services, such as mammography, and laboratory services also will be offered.

Mequon Health Center to open Oct. 19 Steve Lettau 2017-10-12 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Oct 06, 2017

JoAnn Vetter leads a Salsa dance class during our club's Friday meeting. Donald Driver watch out!

Dancing with the Rotarians Steve Lettau 2017-10-06 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Oct 05, 2017

By Jeff Rumage, Now News Group

OZAUKEE COUNTY - An I-43 resurfacing project will require nighttime lane closures on the 10-mile stretch between County Line Road in Mequon to Highway 32 in Grafton.

This routine maintenance project consists of route and seal, crack sealing and pavement markings. The work is expected to start at the end of September and last through November, according to the Department of Transportation.

Lane closures will take place from 8 p.m. to 6 a.m. weekdays, with possible lane and ramp closures during weekends. During nighttime closures, a single lane of traffic will remain open in each direction at all times.

No lane closures are scheduled during commuter hours. Work restrictions are in place during special events such as Green Bay Packers home games.

I-43 will be resurfaced from County Line Road to Highway 32 Steve Lettau 2017-10-05 05:00:00Z 0
2017 Lobsterfest Photo Gallery Steve Lettau 2017-10-03 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Oct 03, 2017

President Cindy Shaffer welcomes Ryan Walsh as our club’s newest member. Pictured from left: Dan O’Connor, Ryan Walsh, Brian Monroe, Cindy Shaffer and Terry Schacht. (Photo by Bob Blazich)

Ryan Walsh welcomed as new member Steve Lettau 2017-10-03 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Oct 02, 2017

All of us at the Mequon - Thiensville Sunrise Rotary Club
want to thank you for your support of
Lobsterfest 2017

Thank You! Steve Lettau 2017-10-02 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Sep 29, 2017

Celebrate HOPE - 10 years of Spreading Hope!
by Hope Without Borders-USA

Welcome to our 10 year anniversary celebration. So much has happened in the last 10 years, but nothing could of happened without the support of all our donors, family and friends.

Please join us as we celebrate HOPE and all the lives we have touched over the last 10 years.

Where: Comedy Sportz Club, 420 S 1st St., Milwaukee, WI 53204

When: Saturday, November 4, 2017 | 5:00 PM – 10:00 PM CDT

Schedule:

  • 5:00-5:30 pm Check in
  • 5:00-7:00 pm Social Time/Pasta bar and appetizers will be served**
  • 5:00-9:30 pm Raffle/Silent Auction (Closes at 9 pm, drawing at 9:30)
  • 7:30-9:00 pm Improv Comedy Show and a "walk down memory lane"

**Beverages can be purchased at the bar.

Tickets bought online $35 (plus ticket fee)

Tickets purchased at the door: $40

Please purchase tickets early so we know how much food to order!

Hope Without Borders Fundraiser Steve Lettau 2017-09-29 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Sep 28, 2017

Thanks to former MT member Jerry Gold, who transferred to Milwaukee North Shore RC, we have a great opportunity to do our first tree planting project. Mequon Nature Preserve is providing 200 trees for their restoration work and all they need are some people of action to plant them on Monday 16 October. We’ll be teaming with Milwaukee North Shore and possibly another Rotary Club, but volunteers can also be friends and family of members too.

Jerry has coordinated two work shifts 9am-12pm and 1:00pm-4:pm. The 200 hundred trees will mostly be 5 gallon buckets. But there is mulching and other things people can do to participate. Mequon Nature Preserve will supply the equipment needed.

Planning ahead for next year if we want to blow away our tree planting goal, we can also participate in planting 3,000 tree saplings. They do this around Earth day for their earth day initiative. Now that would really be an opportunity to show Rotary “making a difference”.

Thanks, Brian
D6270 Tree Planting Coordinator

One Tree Planted for Every Rotarian-Action Day Monday October 16 Steve Lettau 2017-09-28 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Sep 28, 2017

By Alec Johnson, Now News Group

Homestead High School students are ready to throw it back to the '90s as part of their weeklong homecoming activities from Oct. 2-7.

The activities begin Monday, Oct. 2, with the kickoff of homecoming dance ticket sales; they conclude with a "Party Like It's 1999" homecoming dance Saturday, Oct. 7. 

The first day for spirit wear is Tuesday, Oct. 3, with the theme of Denim Day. Students are encouraged to wear "Back to the '90's"-style jackets and jeans. 

Wednesday, Oct. 4, is Jersey Day, and students can wear a Homestead, college or pro team's jersey. Wednesday is also the day for the powder puff game, at 7 p.m. on the athletic field. The cost is $3; all proceeds go to the Highlanders Together campaign.

Homestead High School readies for 90's-themed homecoming Steve Lettau 2017-09-28 05:00:00Z 0
Support Our 2017 Lobsterfest Steve Lettau 2017-09-28 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Sep 21, 2017

After voters approved a $39.9 million referendum in April, the Grafton School District took its first step in renovation and expansion projects at Grafton High School, Kennedy and Woodview elementary schools by breaking ground in a Sept. 12 ceremony near the school district's offices.

“The district is very excited to see these projects get underway,” said Grafton Schools Superintendent Jeff Nelson in a district news release. “Through the entire planning and design process, we were focused on developing building solutions that would meet our students’ academic needs and ensure their continued safety, while also being fiscally responsible to the district’s taxpayers. I believe we’ve accomplished these goals.” 

The ceremony included a number of students representing each of its schools, from the elementary level to high school. Grafton High School senior Ian Bould spoke at the ceremony on behalf of the district's students.

"It was great to involve students because that's really what this whole process is for," Nelson said.

The groundbreaking is the culmination of a process that the district began with Hoffman Planning, Design & Construction in 2014. Hoffman will oversee the projects' construction.

“These projects address important needs at the three schools,” said Hoffman President Sam Statz. “In addition to enhancement of each school to accommodate more students and provide upgraded technology and athletic spaces, improvements in safety, security, and accessibility will also take place.” 

Grafton School District begins construction on approved referendum projects Steve Lettau 2017-09-21 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Sep 21, 2017
Click banner for more information
MKE Film Festival Steve Lettau 2017-09-21 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Sep 15, 2017

Some moments from the Adult Spelling Bee held last week at Rotary Park, Mequon. Thanks to all participants for a very successful fundraiser. (Photos by Bob Blazich)

Spell Successful! Steve Lettau 2017-09-15 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Sep 14, 2017

Chiara (pictured 6th from left) just came back from a wonderful weekend in Green Lake at the Rotary orientation. She met many other Rotary exchange students through this experience.

She is looking forward to meeting everyone this Friday morning at our Rotary meeting!

Jennifer Sutherland

Chiara's Rotary Orientation Steve Lettau 2017-09-14 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Sep 14, 2017

By Frank Bures from The Rotarian Magazine

Imagine, if you will, the worst meeting of your life: The clock moves more slowly than the laws of physics should allow. Garbled strands of jargon fall from the mouths of those around you. Whatever vague goals had been uttered before the meeting are forgotten, left far behind, like roadkill on a long ride to nowhere.

That trapped feeling is probably as old as the first tribal gathering. And judging by some books for sale today ("Meetings Suck," "Death by Meeting"), not much has changed in the intervening millennia.

Meetings may be one of the most maligned and dreaded of humanity’s rituals, but they are not going away. Nor should they: Every week, some 1.2 million Rotarians meet around the world in an effort to make it a little better. Every year, meetings, conferences, and conventions across the United States inject around $280 billion into the economy. And every day, millions of people meet at their workplace to try to move their company toward some goal.

Meeting like this Steve Lettau 2017-09-14 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Sep 07, 2017

The Rotary Foundation and clubs along the Gulf Coast of Texas and Louisiana, USA, are collecting emergency relief funds to help flood victims of Hurricane Harvey, which slammed into southeast Texas over the weekend.

Severe rainfall has caused historic flooding along the Texas coast, including in Houston, the fourth largest city by population in the United States. Deluged towns in the region are in desperate need of aid as thousands of residents were forced to flee their homes. About 6.8 million people have been affected by the hurricane, which made landfall on 25 August.

With an estimated damage of $190 billion, Hurricane Harvey could be the costliest natural disaster in U.S. history.

“The power of Rotary is in the foundation's ability to pull help from around the world while local clubs provide immediate relief in their own communities,” says Don Mebus of the Rotary Club of Arlington, Texas.

Rotary helps Hurricane Harvey victims Steve Lettau 2017-09-07 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Aug 31, 2017

Meet Norrie Daroga and his assistant Natasha of idavatars in Mequon.

Norrie was the high bidder for the Dessert of the Month at last years LobsterFest. Here he's holding the Schacht family favorite Pistachio Torte made by Cindy Schacht.

Be sure to attend this year's LobsterFest on September 30 and be the high bidder for this and many other items. Visit www.mylobsterfest.org for more information.

Lobsterfest - Dessert of the Month Steve Lettau 2017-08-31 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Aug 31, 2017

Newer MT member Pablo Gutierrez has accepted a promotional opportunity with Wells Fargo. This new role will take him to Sparks Nevada. Pablo regrets his fast departure and not being able to say goodbye to his MT friends. He was very surprised that he was chosen for this position and he referred to it a “dream job”.

This move will also take I’m closer to family. He mentioned to Wells Fargo that he wants to continue in Rotary and has started exploring the many Rotary clubs in the Sparks/Reno area. His email will stay the same, so if any of us are in the area he encourages us to look him up.

Brian Monroe

Wishing You Continued Success Pablo With Your Move Steve Lettau 2017-08-31 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Aug 31, 2017

The American Cancer Society Road to Recovery program relies on volunteer drivers to take cancer patients to and from their treatments. Lack of transportation is often a major problem for cancer patients when either they have no transportation or are too ill to drive. Family and friends may help, but are not always available.

We are looking for more volunteer drivers to help cancer patients in your area. Time commitments vary but rides are generally during the weekday and each Road to Recovery volunteer driver decides how much time he or she contributes. Requirements for participation include a valid, current driver’s license, a safe driving record and proof of insurance, as well as completing the application process and a brief training session.

For more information on volunteering as a Road to Recovery driver, contact the American Cancer Society at 1-800-227-2345 or visit cancer.org/drive.

Volunteer Drivers Needed Steve Lettau 2017-08-31 05:00:00Z 0
Rotary Membership Campaign Video (3 of 3) Steve Lettau 2017-08-30 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Aug 25, 2017

Jeff Reed, 6270 District Governor, welcomes Andrea Jorgensen to Mequon Thiensville Sunrise Rotary club. Pictured L to R: Jeff Reed, Cindy Shaffer - Club President, Andrea Jorgensen, Tom Martin - Andrea’s sponsor and Terry Schacht - Assistant District Governor. (Photo by Bob Blazich)

Welcome Andrea Jorgensen as our newest member Steve Lettau 2017-08-25 05:00:00Z 0
Rotary Membership Campaign Video (2 of 3) Steve Lettau 2017-08-24 05:00:00Z 0
Rotary Membership Campaign Video (1 of 3) Steve Lettau 2017-08-17 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Aug 17, 2017

When DG Jeff visits our club next week he’ll be talking about a some of RI President Ian Riseley’s goals for this Rotary year 2017-2018 and how our district 6270 can participate and contribute to achieving them. I feel that these goals will be easy for our members to embrace, especially the “One Tree Planted for Every Rotarian”. Many clubs and districts are planning on exceeding that goal.

This tree planting goal is one that I feel hits home with our club’s enthusiasm for greening our Mequon-Thiensville communities. We continue to do restoration work in Pukaite Woods and we are now enjoying the benefits of our successful Redbud Project. So for this tree planting goal to be completed by Earth Day 22 April, we’ll need to decide on a specific plan. Good news w’ve already been approached to partner with another Rotary club to plant trees in the Mequon Nature Preserve this October. There will be more to share as additional information becomes available.

Yes there are many reasons to plant trees; for positive environmental impacts, for sustainability, for beauty, for the future and for friends and family. I was unable to come back for Bob Leonardt’s funeral, but there is now a visual reminder of Bob’s friendship on a small farm in northern Michigan. Seven of my favorite trees, one for each of Bob’s decades now stand together.

Peace, Brian Monroe
D6270 Tree Planting Coordinator

One Tree Planted for Every Rotarian Steve Lettau 2017-08-17 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Aug 17, 2017

By Past District Governor Chris Offer, member of the Rotary Club of Ladner, British Columbia, Canada

Wildfires in the forests of British Columbia are common but the fire season in 2017 has been one of the most destructive in many years. At its peak, 40,000 people were evacuated from farms, villages, and cities. More than 1,000 fires were burning 100,000 hectares. Numerous highways were closed, isolating large parts of the province.

Meanwhile, in the hope of moving permanently to Canada, and after more than a year filling out forms for a two-year, Canadian work permit, Barbara and Gregor Kuehn and their four young children finally arrived in Vancouver from Switzerland. They were en route to a ranch in Redstone, west of Williams Lake, British Columbia, an isolated part of the province’s interior, where they expected to work for the next two years. With all roads to their destination blocked by wildfires, they didn’t make it and they had no place to stay. Rotary stepped in to help.

The Rotary network at work Steve Lettau 2017-08-17 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Aug 17, 2017

M-T Sunrise Rotary Club gave a $500 grant earlier this year to the Jail Literacy Program of Ozaukee County to support purchase of educational materials for individuals enrolled in the Jail Literacy Program, which is totally operated by volunteers and supported by donations like ours. During discussion of the grant request, a question was raised about the value of buying materials for a small program like that. Below is a letter from a graduate of the literacy program that responds to our question.

Do You Ever Wonder About Rotary’s Value To Our Community? Steve Lettau 2017-08-17 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Aug 10, 2017

From The Rotarian

The Rotary Club of Philadelphia offers different levels of membership, including full, a la carte with "pay as you go" lunches, and a Happy Hour Club.

“When I joined there were around 120 members, but we bled members,” says Matthew Tae, past president of the Rotary Club of Philadelphia. 

For some time, the officers had been tracking the demographics of the club, and it was clear that it was not attracting enough new younger members.

“We meet at the Union League, which is expensive relative to other Rotary clubs,” Tae explains. “These days, a person early in their career, in their 30s, can’t get away for 90 minutes plus travel time at lunch on a workday. We needed a model where you could participate but not disrupt lunch hour.” 

Club innovation: Choose your membership level Steve Lettau 2017-08-10 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Aug 03, 2017

By Jeff Rumage

MEQUON - Two patties, an extra slice of bun in the middle and secret sauce.

Many Milwaukee-area residents fondly remember Big Boy hamburgers. The last remaining Wisconsin Marc’s Big Boy restaurant closed its doors in 1995, but the famous burgers will soon be available again.

Ovation Sarah Chudnow, a Jewish faith-based senior living and care provider, is hosting a Big Boy Reunion on Wednesday, Aug. 9.

The evening includes a dinner of classic favorites — the Big Boy Burger, famous onion rings, fries and strawberry pie — along with a special presentation by guest speakers Steve and Greg Marcus. Greg Marcus is president and CEO and Steve Marcus is chairman of the board for The Marcus Corporation. For nearly 40 years the company operated more than 60 Big Boy restaurants in the Midwest.

Marc's Big Boy hamburgers to make a comeback at Mequon event Steve Lettau 2017-08-03 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Jul 27, 2017

By Kevin Cook - The Rotarian Magazine

May 2015, a half-dozen civic leaders met in Flower Mound, Texas, a short drive (or long kickoff) from Dallas. Five were already Rotarians, but while they enjoyed their weekly meetings, they were itching to try some ideas of their own. “Meeting time, for one thing,” recalls Andy Eads, a Denton County commissioner whose energy level could power several suburbs. “Thursday at lunch wasn’t working for us.”  

The six founders wanted to get a jump on the workday, not stop in the middle for a lunch meeting. They discussed founding a club that would meet at 7 a.m. or even 6:30, but bank President Julie Meyer and a couple of other parents in the group said no. “We have to get breakfast on the table and kids off to school before we start serving humanity.” In the end, they settled on 8 a.m. Fridays – a breakfast meeting to start the day.

Next question: Who else should be in the club? 

“Let’s all pull out our phones,” Eads told them. “Scroll down your contacts. We’re looking for people who would enjoy Rotary. People who’ve got the three T’s: talent, time, and treasure.”

Tradition meets flexibility at this high-energy Texas club Steve Lettau 2017-07-27 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Jul 20, 2017

Free Family Fun!

See the Historic Nieman House 6/20/2017

July 30, 2017, 12pm-4pm

Enjoy a Family Fun day touring the Nieman House, reliving and exploring what it was like in the 1950s. It will be a fun-filled day with Ice Cream, Lemonade, Face Painting, and a Silent Auction. See what is new with the Mequon-Thiensville Historical Society.

For more information click here.

See the Historic Nieman House Steve Lettau 2017-07-20 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Jul 20, 2017

Congratulation to Kristen and Bobby Fisher on the birth of Alessandra Marie Fisher. Alessandra was born on 7/12/17 at 12:24AM. Statistics: 6 lbs. 2 oz. and 20 inches.

Bobby writes that Kristen and Alessandra are doing well and breast feeding successfully. Alessandra has obviously been adjusted 3 times so far.

She will be at her first Rotary meeting in a few weeks! Family says she is definitely a Fisher.

Introducing Alessandra Marie Fisher Steve Lettau 2017-07-20 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Jul 20, 2017

By Jeff Rumage

Mequon - Concordia University Wisconsin’s theater department will perform “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” at its Mequon campus, 12800 North Lake Shore Drive, July 21-23.

CUW theater professor Lori Woodall has long dreamed of creating an outdoor summer series and selected this Shakespearean comedy as the inaugural production.

“I chose ‘A Midsummer Night’s Dream’ because it is the quintessential summer play, and nothing is more festive than Elizabethan theater,” Woodall said.

Performances will take place in the president's courtyard, which Woodall intends to transform into a “mini-Renaissance fair” complete with fairies to get the audience into the spirit of the beloved 16th century comedy.

Woodall is co-directing the show with CUW literature professor Brian Harries and alumnus Nic Cicerale. The production will consist of 18 actors, including five alumni and children of Concordia’s faculty and staff members.

Performances are at 6 p.m. Friday, July 21 and Saturday, July 22 and 4 p.m. Sunday, July 23. Tickets are $10 for adults, $8 for seniors, $5 for veterans, and free for children under 12. For more information, call the box office at 262-243-4444.

Concordia University Wisconsin presents 'A Midsummer Night's Dream' Steve Lettau 2017-07-20 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Jul 13, 2017

Join Southeastern Wisconsin and North Chicago Rotarians for this battle of the titans, celebrate our military servants from Wisconsin & Illinois Veteran Medical Care Centers and promote "Service Above Self" with pride!

Tailgate Party and Game

Saturday, July 29th

Chicago Cubs vs. Milwaukee Brewers at Miller Stadium, Milwaukee

Tailgate Party starts at 3:10 p.m.; Game Time is at 6:10 p.m.

For more information or to order tickets click here.

3rd Annual Brewer's-Cub Tailgate Party and Game Steve Lettau 2017-07-13 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Jul 13, 2017

By Guy Boulton, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

The Mequon clinic, scheduled to open in October, will include primary care and urgent care with extended hours, women’s health and obstetrics/gynecology services. Specialty care will include endocrinology, orthopedics and sports medicine, spine care, physical, occupational and speech therapy, podiatry and pain management.

The clinic also will provide mammography and other imaging services, as well as laboratory services. In addition, it plans to provide virtual consults and e-visits.

Physicians employed by Froedtert & MCW Community Physicians and specialists employed by the Medical College will staff the clinic.

The clinic will employ the equivalent of 35 full-time employees. The clinic planned for Oak Creek, in contrast, will employ about 150 people. The Mequon clinic, unlike the clinics in New Berlin and Oak Creek, will not have an ambulatory surgical center.

Froedtert Health and the Medical College of Wisconsin plan new clinic in Mequon Steve Lettau 2017-07-13 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Jul 06, 2017

By Tory Paxson, Rotary Club of Boothbay Harbor, Maine, USA

On Tuesday, 13 June, we sat down in a cool auditorium in the Carter Center in Atlanta, Georgia, for the first annual Women in Rotary Event. The four of us sitting together were all women, all members of my Rotary club, and all at our very first Rotary International Convention. We were unaware of the impact this event was about to have on us. But then, the lights began to dim.

It has only been a short 30 years since the landmark decision to allow women to join Rotary. Being only 27 years of age myself, this reality seems a bit absurd. All of these incredible, passionate and driven women I have met since joining Rotary have only had the space of my lifetime to catch up in leadership roles, in Rotary pride and projects? Really? And yet as lights shone down on our presenters, we felt that 30 years, while short, has been plenty of time for these women to shine.

New award celebrates success of women in Rotary Steve Lettau 2017-07-06 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Jul 06, 2017

By JR Radcliffe

Joel Beard remembers the music he heard running out onto that floor.

"Our band was very good, and just being able to run out on the floor and play, making 3-pointers and the crowd holding up 3-point signs, that was pretty special at the time," said Beard, the current Beloit Memorial athletics director and a member of the Homestead basketball teams from 1991-95. "That was a really special group and a really special time for Homestead sports in general. We won a lot of big games on that floor."

For 17 seasons, including one memorable state semifinalist season in 1994, Homestead basketball teams led by coach John Chekouras piled up wins on the main gymnasium floor at Homestead High School. Now, that same gym floor will bear Chekouras’ name.

Homestead High School to name main gym floor after late coach John Chekouras Steve Lettau 2017-07-06 05:00:00Z 0
Advocates Meal Prep and Cook-Out Steve Lettau 2017-07-06 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Jun 29, 2017

At a recent Rotary meeting, we had the pleasure of being introduced to Julie Zumach from the organization Our Community Listens.  I am very excited about the future of Our Community Listens and the positive impact it will have on the lives of people in Mequon and the surrounding communities. This FREE 3 day communication skills course will be held right here at Newcastle Place September 19-21.

This event is open to anyone 18 and older.  Please note the maximum class size is 18, so don't delay!

Questions? Contact Jennifer Sutherland at jsutherland@newcastleplace.com.

Communication Skills Training Steve Lettau 2017-06-29 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Jun 29, 2017

By Erik S. Hanley and Jeff Rumage

On the Fourth of July, no matter where you are it's likely you'll hear fireworks going off.

If you want to see them as well and participate in other festivities in Ozaukee County, these are the celebrations each community is holding.

Cedarburg

The roughly two-hour parade begins at 10 a.m. in downtown Cedarburg on Tuesday, July 4, followed by an all-day picnic and live music in Cedar Creek Park.

Fireworks at dusk.

Grafton

Parade begins at 11 a.m. Saturday, July 1, at Grafton High School, 1950 Washington St., and continues west down Washington and then east on 17th Avenue to Centennial Park, 1370 17th Ave.

Fireworks at dusk July 1 at Centennial Park.

Port Washington

Parade begins at 11 a.m. Tuesday, July 4, in downtown and Veterans Park, North Lake Street. Ice cream social, kids games and activities to follow.

Fireworks at dusk.

Saukville

Parade begins at 1 p.m. Tuesday, July 4, with activities at Grady Park on North Park Street to follow.

Fireworks will be held at dusk at Peninsula Park, 301 E. Clay St.

Fourth festivities set for Ozaukee County Steve Lettau 2017-06-29 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Jun 22, 2017

Dr. Demond Means is presented with a Certificate of Appreciation at Friday’s club meeting. Pictured from left: Demond Means, Lucia Francis club President. (Photo: Bob Blazich)

Mequon-Thiensville School District Superintendent Demond Means is heading to Georgia. The Clarke County School District unanimously approved a contract to hire Means as its superintendent at its May 4 school board meeting.

MT Sunrise Rotary Honors Dr. Demond Means Steve Lettau 2017-06-22 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Jun 22, 2017

CEDARBURG - The smell of strawberry bratwurst will fill the air June 24-25 for the 32nd annual Cedarburg Strawberry Festival.

But why strawberries?

“Why not?” asked BJ Homayouni, executive director of Festivals of Cedarburg, Inc. She said the festival “has to do with what was available in the area in June.”

Homayouni said Cedar Creek Winery’s owner’s wife was an artist and they chose to start the wine and harvest festival to pull art and wine together. Down the line, they invited a local farmer who grew strawberries and the strawberry festival was born and has grown into the biggest in Cedarburg with around 100,000 visitors each year.

“Strawberries speak summer,” Homayouni said. “It’s the first big event in the area in summer. We don’t have blueberries around here, just strawberries.”

The event will be held from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., June 24 and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., June 25 on Washington Avenue in historic downtown Cedarburg. Artwork ranging from paintings to jewelry, ceramics and woodwork will be available for purchase from hundreds of artists.

Strawberries are special in Cedarburg for annual festival June 24-25 Steve Lettau 2017-06-22 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Jun 14, 2017

Gathering on the Green is a Mequon based organization that presents exceptional entertainment and advances youth education.

July 14: Gathering on the Green, Rotary Park, Mequon
Kenny Loggins & Michael McDonald

July 15: Gathering on the Green, Rotary Park, Mequon
Daya with special guest Vocalight

 

FOR MORE INFORMATION OR TO ORDER TICKETS
CLICK GATHERING ON THE GREEN LOGO

Gathering on the Green Steve Lettau 2017-06-14 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Jun 08, 2017

THIENSVILLE -  The Thiensville-Mequon Lions Club's 53rd annual Lionfest will bring concerts, cars, chicken and carnival rides to Thiensville Village Park this weekend.

Lionfest will host "Family and Teen Night" featuring only carnival rides from 5 to 9 p.m. Thursday, June 8. 

The full Lionfest festival kicks off at 5 p.m. Friday, June 9. Jerry & Nora with The Revue will play from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m., followed by The Toys, who will play from 8:30 p.m. to midnight. Chicken dinners will be for sale from 6 to 8 p.m.

Lionfest opens at noon Saturday. Texas '55 will play from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m., followed by Dirty Boogie from 5  to 8:30 p.m. and Bella Cain from 8:30 p.m. to midnight. Carnival rides will be open from noon to 4 p.m. Chicken dinners will be sold from 2 to 8 p.m.

Lionfest opens at noon Sunday with a car show. Floor It will play until 2 p.m., followed by Texas '55 from 2 to 5 p.m. Carnival rides will be open from noon to 4 p.m.

Classic cars, carnival rides highlight Lions Fest Steve Lettau 2017-06-08 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Jun 08, 2017

During an awards presentation on Friday 2 June at the D6270 Conference held at Potawatomi Chuck Zamora was recognized by DG Julie Craig with a PHF award as a show of gratitude for his presentation of “The Tools of Life” to 60 high school students.

These 60 students now are part of the 93,000+ alumni that Chuck has presented this program to over the years. I talked to some of the RYE students that attended the all day session on Friday and they thought that it was great and that they really learned some valuable information that they can immediately put use.

When Chuck got back to his seat he was beaming and said, “pretty cool”. I wholeheartedly agreed. Congratulations Chuck!

Brian Monroe

MT’s Newest Paul Harris Fellow Steve Lettau 2017-06-08 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Jun 07, 2017

This nomadic photographer has spent a career capturing the range of human experience

By Julie Bain from The Rotarian

Steve McCurry doesn’t run from danger. He steels his courage, calculates his risks, and plunges into it. He has seen things we couldn’t have imagined if we didn’t have the proof of his stunning photos: images captured with his camera inches from the weapons of mujahedeen insurgents fighting the Soviet invasion in Afghanistan, or his camera held on top of his head while waist-deep in monsoon waters in India. He braved toxic black smoke while chronicling the burning oil fields in Kuwait, and after shooting the collapse of the twin towers from the roof of his Greenwich Village apartment building on 9/11, he raced as fast as he could toward who-knows-what at ground zero.

Despite the horrors he has seen, though, “Nothing has dented my faith in the human spirit or in unexpected human kindness,” he wrote in the foreword to his 2013 book Untold: The Stories behind the Photographs. That spirit is evident in the compelling images of daily life he has captured around the world, from Bangladesh to Yemen. He is especially famous for his revealing portraits. Those include the one that appeared on the cover of National Geographic in 1985 and became one of the most famous photographs of all time: the Afghan refugee girl with the haunting green eyes.

His work in Afghanistan opened his eyes to the needs of children there, especially girls. That led him and his sister to create a nonprofit called ImagineAsia to help more of them. We asked McCurry to judge our 2017 photo contest, while sharing insights into his own fiercely independent journey as a photographer who sheds light on cultures around the world. Frequent contributor Julie Bain met with McCurry at his studio in New York City.

Steve McCurry brings the world into focus Steve Lettau 2017-06-07 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Jun 01, 2017

By Ty Schmidt

MEQUON - Countless hours of prep work and practice have been happening for months behind the scenes at Homestead High School.

And while all that hard work and dedication has certainly prepared them for their concert Thursday, May 18, a special Skype conversation on May 11 sealed the deal.

Academy Award-nominated composer Marco Beltrami, of “5:10 to Yuma” and “The Hurt Locker” fame, Skyped with about 100 students to discuss his experiences as a major Hollywood composer and specifically his work on the 2016 film “Gods of Egypt.”

Homestead High School students add working with composer to practice repertoire Steve Lettau 2017-06-01 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on May 25, 2017

By Erik S. Hanley

CEDARBURG - Interested in flying a drone, converting old media to digital, designing projects with Adobe software or maybe experiencing virtual reality?

Within the next year, all of these new offerings will be available at the Cedarburg Public Library.

Assistant Director David Nimmer said the library has received a total of $12,000 in grants with half from the Greater Cedarburg Foundation and the other half from the Greater Milwaukee Foundation’s Friends of the Cedarburg Library. These funds will be used to bring four new features to the library that were highly requested in the latest community survey distributed last year.

“We’re pretty much doing all the top requested things,” Nimmer said.

Cedarburg library to offer Adobe, virtual reality, drones, and digitization lab Steve Lettau 2017-05-25 05:00:00Z 0
Dr. Demond Means - A Farewell Celebration Steve Lettau 2017-05-24 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on May 19, 2017
Dick Larson is inducted at this morning’s club meeting. Pictured from left: Terry Schacht Assistant District Governor & club member, Lucia Francis - President, Alice Sedgwick - Sponsor and Dick Larson. (Photo Bob Blazich)
Dick Larson Inducted Steve Lettau 2017-05-19 05:00:00Z 0
Rotary Exchange Student is guest speaker Steve Lettau 2017-05-19 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on May 18, 2017
 

WaterFire Providence was proud to host a Basin Lighting for The Rotary International Conference 2017! This beautiful event illuminated the heart of the city of providence and brought joy to thousands who came to witness the spectacle! Thank you Rotary International for making this event possible!

WaterFire Providence | April 28th, 2017 - Rotary International Conference Steve Lettau 2017-05-18 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on May 18, 2017

By Ty Schmidt,

CEDARBURG - A fresh face will take the stage at Gathering on the Green on Saturday, July 15.

“We’re trying something new this year, bringing in a teen pop sensation that we hope helps draw younger people and families to our event,” said Gathering on the Green Executive Director Rob Kos.

The organization announced on May 11 that the Saturday night headliner at their summer concert event will be Grammy Award winning pop star Daya.

Best known for her platinum plus singles “Sit Still, Look Pretty,” “Hideaway” and “Words,” Daya won “Best Dance Recording” at the 2017 Grammy Awards, as well as a handful of other awards at the American Music Awards and MTV Music Awards.

‘Sit Still, Look Pretty’ at Gathering on the Green Steve Lettau 2017-05-18 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on May 12, 2017

Sr. Patricia Rogers, Executive Director of the Dominican Center for Women was our guest speaker at this morning’s meeting.

The Dominican Center works with Amani residents and partners to build a better future.

The Dominican Center for Women (DCW) was founded in 1995 by Sinsinawa Dominicans, Sister Ann Halloran, OP and Sister Anne-Marie Doyle, OP as an urban ministry program.Their vision was to develop a holistic approach to education and women's programs in the Amani neighborhood.

Sinsinawa Dominicans believe that the heart of ministry is relationships. DCW realizes this by involving residents in decision-making and acting upon their concerns and preferences. DCW programs have expanded beyond basic skills, to include GED preparation, financial literacy, home repairs, health and safety.

In 2012, the Dominican Center was designated the lead community anchor for the Building Neighborhood Capacity Program (BNCP). BNCP is part of the White House Neighborhood Revitalization Initiative to 1) address poverty and the underlying critical and interlocking issues of education, employment, housing, health and safety in distressed neighborhoods; and 2) design and implement a resident led revitalization plan.

Today, the Dominican Center serves as a community anchor organization and provides a platform for the development of a community organization comprised of Amani residents who work together to solve problems affecting neighborhood well-being.

The Dominican Center has a long history of collaborating with COA-Goldin Center, Hephatha Lutheran Church, Safe and Sound and District 5 of the Milwaukee Police Department.

Sr. Patricia Rogers - Building a Better Future Steve Lettau 2017-05-12 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on May 11, 2017

By Erik S. Hanley

MEQUON - Mequon-Thiensville School District Superintendent Demond Means is heading to Georgia.

The Clarke County School District unanimously approved a contract to hire Means as its superintendent at its May 4 school board meeting.

According to a release from the Mequon-Thiensville School District sent minutes after the approval, Means' service to MTSD will end June 30 with his appointment as superintendent of CCSD, based in Athens, beginning in July. With such a fast turnaround, Means said the transition has already started now that things have been solidified.

“I cannot imagine a more ideal incoming superintendent for the Clarke County School District and the Athens community," said CCSD Board President Charles Worthy in the release.

Means taking Georgia superintendent job, leaving MTSD in June Steve Lettau 2017-05-11 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on May 04, 2017

By Nikki Kallio

While many people would like to think that slavery was a tragedy of the past, the truth is that it still exists today, with up to 46 million people enslaved worldwide.

The Rotarian Action Group Against Slavery (RAGAS) has a strategy for fighting this horrible problem, working at the local level. 

“It’s this Rotarian attitude – you give them a problem and instead of throwing their hands up in dismay, they start chipping away at it piece by piece,” says Carol Hart Metzker, a member of the action group. “Maybe slavery won’t be solved in my lifetime, but in two more years, we’re going to have a whole hamlet free.”

In a village in northeastern India, the action group is tackling the problem of debt bondage. With the help of 13 clubs, a district grant through the Rotary Club of Binghamton, New York, USA, and other sources, the action group is providing $36,000 toward the work of Schools4Freedom, a project of the organization Voices4Freedom. Schools4Freedom works with local partner organization Manav Sansadhan Evam Mahila Vikas Sansthan (MSEMVS) to battle debt bondage. 

Education breaks the cycle of modern slavery Steve Lettau 2017-05-04 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on May 04, 2017

By Erik S. Hanley

MEQUON - Sommer's Subaru, 7211 W. Mequon Road, recently donated $10,000 to the Weyenberg Public Library Foundation to help support youth and family services.

According to a news release, the donation from Don and Wally Sommer "continues long-standing support from the Sommer family and Sommer's Subaru to the Weyenberg Library and its Foundation."

The donation will be used to expand library services such as the Lego clubs and STEAM programming.

"The programs encourage creativity and problem-solving skills in the leaders of tomorrow," the release said.

Sommer’s Subaru donates $10,000 to Weyenberg Public Library Foundation Steve Lettau 2017-05-04 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Apr 27, 2017

By Gary Achterberg

Mayor Dan Abendroth paid tribute to Pukaite, presenting her with a plaque, a city street sign with her name and a resolution that declared Tuesday as “Connie Pukaite Day” in the city.

Pukaite stepped down from the dais and asked to speak for a few minutes. She said she appreciated the opportunity to serve the community again when she was elected to the Common Council as a write-in candidate. She was mayor from 1986 to 1992 and served four years prior to that as an alderman.

Connie Pukaite honored Steve Lettau 2017-04-27 05:00:00Z 0
MT Sunrise Rotary Kayak/Canoe Event Steve Lettau 2017-04-27 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Apr 20, 2017

By Erik S. Hanley

MEQUON – The “keys to the city” along with other gifts were presented to the family of Alderwoman Pam Adams who died last February.

Mayor Dan Abendroth said Adams had a lot of wisdom, conscientiousness, and style during the presentation at the April 18 common council meeting.

“She had a lot of style,” he said, smiling.

Speaking to Adams’ family, Abendroth said they made the “greatest contribution of all” in supporting Adams work in Mequon. He said her family and friends instilled a sense of duty in Adams for making her community better.

Mequon presents "keys to the city" and other gifts to the family of the late Alderwoman Pam Adams Steve Lettau 2017-04-20 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Apr 20, 2017

MT Sunrise is a member of the MT Chamber of Commerce. Which means all of our members are also members of the MT Chamber and can take advantage of MT Chamber benefits such as this program for young professionals. I’m sure that many MT Sunrise members are unaware of this and other benefits. - Brian Monroe (See invitation below)

Dear Fellow Chamber Member,

The Mequon-Thiensville Chamber of Commerce is proud to introduce an initiative to embrace young, active professional individuals within our local community. We realize that many active young professionals already participate and contribute to other chamber programs and felt there is a great opportunity to focus even more specifically to this demographic. The Young Professionals Group has a mission to provide a networking culture for professionals in the first phase of their career who are looking to develop professionally and build long-lasting relationships with other professionals in Ozaukee County and the surrounding area.

Mequon-Thiensville Chamber of Commerce Young Professionals Steve Lettau 2017-04-20 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Apr 13, 2017

Written by Arnold R. Grahl Photos by Monika Lozinska Chalk art by Nancy Pochis Bank Art Studio

Snow is falling in St. Joseph, Michigan. On this December day, the overcast sky, swirling flakes, and twinkling bulbs of holiday decorations have created a festive, almost Capraesque atmosphere along the brick-paved streets of this community, which sits on a bluff overlooking Lake Michigan. Across the street from the Boulevard Inn, stairs lead down to Silver Beach, a 1,600-foot-long expanse of sand that is the town’s main attraction in warmer months.

Inside the inn’s restaurant, Jackie Huie sits at a corner table explaining the student mentoring program that the Rotary Club of St. Joseph & Benton Harbor started a decade ago – a program that has helped more than 400 local high school students learn more about their dream careers by connecting them with professionals in those fields.

The exposure to community service that the program provides has led students to start Interact clubs at six local schools, including one at St. Joseph High School that has about 150 members. As the Rotarians work their connections to find mentors for students, they have strengthened the bonds between the 140-member Rotary club and its community. And in small ways, the program is even building bridges between St. Joseph and its “twin city” across the St. Joseph River – Benton Harbor, a once-affluent manufacturing town fallen on hard times.

Rotary Club pairs students with celebrity and CEO mentors Steve Lettau 2017-04-13 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Apr 13, 2017

As many Rotarians know in our club, part of our Vocational Services has been to network with job search candidates at the inter-denominational ministry called Lumen Christi Employment Network (LCEN) here in Mequon.  The group meets every Wednesday morning at 7:30 in the St. Cecilia's Hall above the parish offices.  Lumen Christi is located on Mequon Road at the intersection of Range Line Road.

LCEN has helped 623 job search candidates find jobs since it started in 2002.  It was founded by a Paul Harris Award recipient and now a downtown Rotarian Pat Cronin, and Dave Kliber and others, and is now led by some very good people each week.  It's is a free and safe place for people to go when they find themselves looking for a job.  Candidates lose their jobs through corporate  downsizing, mergers, reorganizations, market changes, and other reasons.  People who find themselves in this situation often have a family to support, a mortgage and other loan obligations, and they are scared and often feel lost.

Vocational service avenue update on Lumen Christi Employment Network Steve Lettau 2017-04-13 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Apr 13, 2017

By News Graphic

OZAUKEE COUNTY — The county will hold a Clean Sweep event this year, providing county residents the means to safely dispose of hazardous waste.

The event will be held Friday, June 9 and Saturday, June 10. Residents, agricultural producers and some businesses will be able to drop off hazardous waste at the Ozaukee County Highway Department, 410 S. Spring St. in Port Washington. 

Hazardous waste drop-off requires preregistration and a $20 per-vehicle fee. The fee must be paid with registration.

County announces Clean Sweep waste disposal event Steve Lettau 2017-04-13 05:00:00Z 0
District Conference MKE June 2 & 3 Steve Lettau 2017-04-06 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Apr 06, 2017

By Erik S. Hanley

MEQUON - Concordia University Wisconsin's new academic building at the Mequon campus will be called the Robert W. Plaster Free Enterprise Center.

The Robert W. Plaster Foundation donated a "naming gift" to the college, according to Concordia's website. The gift was to support Concordia's vision of promoting "free market principles across the disciplines of healthcare, education, science, technology, and the arts."

Concordia University Wisconsin names new building Steve Lettau 2017-04-06 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Mar 30, 2017

Our fellow Rotarians at RCofMMA (Rotary Club of Mequon-Milwaukee Afterhours) are having the 2nd Annual Global Fusion fundraiser on Saturday 13 May at Reuter Pavilion at Rotary Park. It’s a great way to finish off our work day at Pukaite Woods.

Details: The Global Fusion, Local Flavor fundrasing event is a fun filled event where various food vendors will provide various ethnic and national cuisines for guests to partake in from 2pm till 6pm. The money raised will be used to continue the funding and support of RCofMMA's local and international youth programs.

Tickets are $25 dollars. Please see me for your tickets.

Thanks,

Brian Monroe

Let’s Show Our Support Steve Lettau 2017-03-30 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Mar 30, 2017

You're invited to participate in the first annual Rotary Sponsored Canoe / Kayak Paddle.

Details:

  • Mandatory PFD (life jacket) required
  • Optional donation to Team River Runner (https://www.facebook.com/TRRMilwaukee)
  • Event will end at Villa Grove Park. A Bonfire and BBQ will follow at 3827 W Freistadt Rd....
  • Saturday, June 17 at 1 PM - 6 PM
  • Highway C Canoe Launch just east of the bridge on the Milwaukee River

About Team River Runner:

Team River Runner believes that every wounded and disabled veteran deserves the opportunity to embrace new challenges, invoke leadership, and promote camaraderie. Team River Runner provides an outlet to fulfill these beliefs – inviting wounded and disabled war veterans and their families to participate in adaptive paddling programs. Founded in 2004 at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, we now offer weekly paddling sessions in 45 locations across the nation.

Team River Runner is more than an adaptive sports program. It’s a program that provides hope and healing to those who have risked so much, yet asked for so little. It’s an opportunity to enjoy nature and realize its social, physical, and emotional benefits, whether it’s tackling whitewater rapids or paddling on peaceful flat-water. It’s an environment that facilitates connection, allowing veterans to reunite with their families and forge relationships with those who have endured similar pain. Our veterans are on the river to recovery.

Questions, contact Dan O'Connor at danny.oconnor.68@gmail.com.

Rotary Sponsored Canoe / Kayak Paddle Steve Lettau 2017-03-30 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Mar 30, 2017

Hosting an exchange student can be incredibly rewarding for your family, bringing an international experience directly into your home. Host families provide room and board and share their lives with our female exchange student, involving her in family, community, and cultural activities.

Do you, or someone you know, have an interest in becoming a host family for the 2017-18 school year? The ideal candidate is someone who lives in Mequon or Thiensville, since the exchange student will be attending Homestead High School. Being on the bus line is convenient! She will need to have a room of her own, and meals need to be provided.

We are looking for 3 host families. The commitment is a period of 3 months per family (flexible).

Please direct all inquiries to our Rotary Youth Exchange Officer, Jennifer Sutherland, at 262-387-8840 or by email at jsutherland@newcastleplace.com.

Host Families Needed Steve Lettau 2017-03-30 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Mar 30, 2017

By Erik S. Hanley

MEQUON - The Mequon-Thiensville School District named three teachers Outstanding Educators of the Year for 2016-17.

Sherry Hovey, Hilary James, and Monica Treptow were nominated by their colleagues for their passion, professionalism, and dedication to excellence in education.

The nominees had to complete an application process that was reviewed by a selection committee. The committee then votes on award distribution at the district level.

MTSD names Outstanding Educators of the Year Steve Lettau 2017-03-30 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Mar 28, 2017

Homestead Interact Volunteering at Feed Our Hungry Children at Lumen Christi Food Packing.

Our group packed about enough food to feed 16,000 people. The program over two days packed enough food to feed over 300,000 people and over the last three years the program has packed over 1,000,000 meals.

Congratulations!

Congratulations Homestead Interact! Steve Lettau 2017-03-28 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Mar 23, 2017

I thought I would pass along opportunities to join in on two great events:

On Tuesday, March 28th, the TM Optimists Club is holding their annual fundraiser at Shully's.  The event starts off with cocktails at 6 and dinner at 7, and the tickets are $60 per person.  If interested, contact Pete Olsen by email, peteolsenpto@gmail.com or call him at 262-242-4748.  Reservations need to be in by this Friday, the 24th.  

On April 5th, Ozaukee Economic Development is hosting a great program at Shully's.  The speaker for this event will be Brad Smith, the son of noon club Rotarian, Stan Smith.  Brad is the president and chief legal officer for Microsoft!!  This is a FREE event and a great opportunity to network.  Cocktails/networking at 4:30, and a program running from 5:30 - 7:30.  If interested, contact Jean Hill at  jhill@co.ozaukee.wi.us. Registration closes on Wednesday, March 29th.

Bob Blazich

Upcoming Events Steve Lettau 2017-03-23 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Mar 23, 2017

By Erik S. Hanley

MEQUON - The city is looking into conducting a traffic and parking analysis on the town center area.

Director of Public Works Kristen Lundeen got input from the common council March 14 regarding the direction to go and when.

Lundeen said the parking and traffic analysis for the civic campus and other adjacent town center developments was recommended as part of a workshop meeting.

Alderman Robert Strzelczyk said residents have been saying they go to the town center and can’t park to visit the amenities they want to visit.

Mequon could analyze parking issue in town center Steve Lettau 2017-03-23 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Mar 16, 2017

By Erik S. Hanley 

MEQUON - The U.S. Department of Education has nominated two Homestead High School students as U.S. Presidential Scholar candidates.

Alexander Cayer and William Clark are among 62 high school seniors from Wisconsin and 5,000 nominated nationwide, according to a news release from the Mequon-Thiensville School District.

Three paths of accomplishment give students the opportunity to become Presidential Scholars, according to the U.S. Department of Education. Approximately 20 additional students are selected based on their academic and artistic scholarship in visual arts, performing arts, or creative writing. Another 20 are selected based on their accomplishments in career and technical education fields.

Homestead High School seniors nominated as U.S. Presidential Scholar candidates Steve Lettau 2017-03-16 05:00:00Z 0
Club Award Nominations Due March 31 Steve Lettau 2017-03-16 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Mar 09, 2017

By Thomas Conroy

Discussion of the proposed apartment development at the St. Francis Borgia site has always brought forth opponents to meetings, but the Cedarburg Planning Commission meeting on Monday, March 6, brought something new to the fold.

For the first time since the HSI Properties-developed apartment was proposed last November, a considerable number of citizens in attendance at the meeting voiced their support for the project.

Cedarburg residents split on SFB apartment plan Steve Lettau 2017-03-09 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Mar 02, 2017

Our sister club RCofMMA has monthly socials and I and a few others from MT have enjoyed attending them. Here is an easy way for MT Members to build goodwill and better friendships while getting to know members of the RCofMMA. They are alternating their socials, one month in Mequon are the next month in the Milw area. These are great opportunities for spouses or potential members to attend and they count as a “Make-Up”.

Here is the upcoming schedule: (all are the 2nd Thursday of the month starting at 5:45pm)

  • 9 March-Zaffiro’s
  • 13 April-Milw Brat House
  • 11 May-Harvey’s
  • 8 June-Big Daddy’s Bayshore

They like to provide the venue with a headcount, so if you plan on attending please send Kola an email by noon the day of at kalayande@live.com.

Thanks, Brian

An Invitation to Build Goodwill and Better Friendships Steve Lettau 2017-03-02 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Mar 02, 2017

By Erik S. Hanley

MEQUON - There may not be buried treasure, but the 37 known shipwrecks off the Wisconsin coast of Lake Michigan are valuable enough that they may soon be protected.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is looking to designate a 1,075-square-mile area of Lake Michigan as a National Marine Sanctuary.

Much of the cargo has value for the historical aspect with two of Wisconsin’s oldest shipwrecks from the 1830s included in the proposed sanctuary area. According to Russ Green, NOAA’s regional coordinator for the Office of National Marine Sanctuaries, most of the ships sank between the 1830s and the late 1920s.

Mequon one of five principal cities involved in potential Lake Michigan National Marine Sanctuary Steve Lettau 2017-03-02 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Feb 23, 2017

Rotary is 1.2 million passionate individuals in 35,000+ clubs worldwide. We are both an international organization and a local community leader. Together we lead change in our own backyards and across the world.

HOW OUR MEMBERSHIP WORKS

Membership in a Rotary club is by invitation only. We want to make sure you join a club that best fits your passion and perspective. We can connect you with a club that's right for you and make it easy to get involved and on your way to membership immediately.

  • You express interest - Let us know a little about yourself and what you’re looking for in a club. We’ll find the local clubs in your area and let them know you’re interested.
  • Rotary matches you with a club - Based on your preferences and interests, Rotary leaders in your community will match you with the local club that fits you best.
  • A local club contacts you - A Rotary club member will contact you by email or phone to discuss your interest in Rotary. You’ll be invited to get to know the club better by attending a club meeting, a social event, or even to join in on a service project as a volunteer.
  • The club invites you to join - Now that you and a local club have spent some time together and determined that you’re a good fit for each other, you will be invited to join. Each club has its own ways of welcoming new members; they may hold a ceremony for you.
  • You’re a member! - Enjoy getting involved in your new club as a Rotary member. Join a committee. Lead a service project. Organize a social event. Lead and contribute to your new club.
Join Rotary Steve Lettau 2017-02-23 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Feb 23, 2017

By Erik S. Hanley

MEQUON - Shaffer Development's offer to purchase the land for Spur 16 Mequon has been approved, but the development agreement still needs some work.

Spur 16 Mequon will be the second phase of the city's town center project.

The purchase was approved at the Feb. 14 Mequon Common Council meeting on a 7-1 vote, with Alderman Mark Gierl the only dissenting voice on the council.

According to the amended offer to purchase, the closing of the land will happen on Aug. 1. The first phase – which includes the majority of the residential development at the north end of the site as well as the east-west road with access off Buntrock Avenue, and the north-south road with access off Mequon Road – must be completed by Dec. 31, 2018.

Spur 16 Mequon land purchase agreement approved, developer agreement put on hold Steve Lettau 2017-02-23 06:00:00Z 0
Newsletter Articles Wanted! Steve Lettau 2017-02-23 06:00:00Z 0
Like Us On Facebook Steve Lettau 2017-02-23 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Feb 23, 2017

 

Calling all Rotarians!

We are partnering with Family Sharing of Ozaukee County to collect non-perishable food items through the month of February.

Family Sharing provides food, at no charge, to people in need in Ozaukee County. All donations of food are distributed directly to those who need it. Their supply is at a critical low this time of year, and we’d like to help support their efforts in collecting items.

Please bring your food donations to our Friday meetings.

Thanks for your support!

Your Support Needed for Family Sharing Food Drive Steve Lettau 2017-02-23 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Feb 16, 2017

If you have a free hour or two tomorrow, Thursday, February 16 and would like to enjoy the spring-like weather, join the Ozaukee Washington Land Trust crew to work in Pukaite Woods anytime between 8:00 a.m. and 4 p.m.

Directions: Follow the trail as far north and east as it goes ... they will be in that north-east quadrant.

Volunteer Today - Pukaite Woods 8AM to 4PM Steve Lettau 2017-02-16 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Feb 16, 2017

Be Vince Lombardi’s nephew

Steve Werner
Rotary Club of Denver Southeast

I had a very good relationship with my uncle. We’re from a big Italian family, so we always had Sunday dinners together when we all lived in the New York metro area. He would have a lot of fun teasing all the kids. He would want us to bring our report cards, and he always grilled us if we got anything less than an A. Then he would break into a big laugh and we would realize he was pulling our legs. At the same time, he always admonished us to do well in school, because he started as a teacher and education was big in our family. 

What It's Like - Be Vince Lombardi’s Nephew Steve Lettau 2017-02-16 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Feb 16, 2017

By Thomas Conroy

The 2017 festival season in Cedarburg begins at 8:30 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 18, with Winter Fest, which continues until Sunday afternoon.

The newest addition to this year's festival will be the grand opening of the Cedarburg History Museum, where guests will be treated to complimentary ice cream at the museum's old-fashioned ice cream parlor.

After taking in information about the history of the city at the museum, visitors can head over to the Community Center and climb aboard the Spudmobile from the Wisconsin Potato and Vegetable Growers Association for the potato industry's most comprehensive educational and informational resource center on wheels.

History museum opening highlights Winter Fest Steve Lettau 2017-02-16 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Feb 09, 2017

MEQUON - The idea came to Rob Kos a few months ago as he was driving to the office.

First, he heard a classic Kenny Loggins song.

Then a legendary hit by Michael McDonald.

And just like that, the concept for the Gathering on the Green’s next big concert was born.

Tickets go on sale at 10 a.m. Friday, Feb. 10, for “One Night … Two Incredible Performances,” a show featuring the talents of both Kenny Loggins and Michael McDonald at 8 p.m. Friday, July 14.

Gathering on Green to enter the Danger Zone Steve Lettau 2017-02-09 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Feb 09, 2017

Where were you born, education/degrees or associations/board seats? I was born at Columbia St. Mary’s Milwaukee, and I grew up in Mequon. I went to UW-Milwaukee where I received my bachelor’s degree from the School of Social Welfare in criminal justice and a minor in women’s studies.

What did you want to be when you grew up? I always wanted to be a police officer. Unfortunately, my husband took that title instead. We felt that two of us having the same profession wouldn’t be a good idea, especially while trying to raise children.

Name of company & position, or your very first job: I worked as the director at a local  youth center right out of college. It was an opportunity to provide a safe space with enriching programs and events for middle school students to go to on the weekends.

Family: I am married to my husband, Eric. We have two daughters, Alaina and Alexis. They are both in college. Alaina is graduating from Arizona State University in May, and Alexis is attending Flagler College in Saint Augustine, Florida. Eric is a detective sergeant at the Grafton Police Dept.

Interests/hobbies/last book read/favorite movie/what’s playing in on your car’s stereo/pastimes: I enjoy warm weather for biking, hiking, exploring parks and beaches and going to places like the Schlitz Audubon Center. I love to collect shells, beach glass and stones from the beach. I’ll be the first one to watch the sun rise at the beach on vacation! I enjoy community festivals and parades in the summer. I love traveling, and my favorite destination is Walt Disney World in Orlando, Florida. My current favorite music artists are the Lumineers and Willie Nelson. I also really love calypso music. Although I don’t have nearly as much time to read as I’d like to, the last book I read was Persuasion by Jane Austen.

Biggest career accomplishment/highlight to date, or what do you like best about your job? I enjoy the fact that I get to provide unique, enriching experiences for seniors in our retirement community. Each day is a new adventure and the possibilities are endless!

Career mentor/favorite words of wisdom/role model: "When you're curious, you find lots of interesting things to do." — Walt Disney

Most memorable Rotary moment or event? In my short time as a Rotarian, the most memorable moment for me was preparing meals for the women and families of Advocates at River Barn Park. It was an opportunity to do something for our community, and to bond with other Rotarians at the same time.

Member Spotlight - Jennifer Sutherland Steve Lettau 2017-02-09 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Feb 02, 2017

This Tuesday (1/24), 100+ business leaders, elected officials, investors and regional economic development practitioners gathered at We Energies to celebrate more than 10 years of working together to grow, expand and attract companies to the Milwaukee Region.

Cofounded by the MMAC, the M7 collaboration has helped 77 companies expand or relocate to the region. Combined, those companies have:

  • Pledged to create 14,000+ jobs
  • A payroll totaling $809+ million per year
  • Capital investments of $1 billion.

Milwaukee 7 Co-chair Gale Klappa, chairman of WEC Energy Group, said, "We are seven counties focused on a common goal. When we add jobs the entire region wins, no matter where in the region a company chooses to expand or relocate."

(Article submitted by Dave Kliber)

Milwaukee 7 economic development partnership celebrates 10+ years of success Steve Lettau 2017-02-02 06:00:00Z 0
Rotary and Shelterbox - Sheltering families after disaster Steve Lettau 2017-02-02 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Feb 02, 2017

By Ty Schmidt

Mequon — The future starts now.

That is among the main reasons why Mequon Alderwoman Connie Pukaite said she has decided against running for re-election in April.

Pukaite, who won her district two seat with 58 percent of the vote in an unprecedented write-in campaign in 2014, has had an active political career in Mequon. She served as an alderwoman from 1981 to 1986 before serving two more terms as mayor from 1986-92.

She was admittedly stunned when she was contacted three years ago by a group of citizens who pleaded with her to serve once more.

“I was definitely flattered, as well as incredibly humbled, when I got the call three weeks before the spring election asking if I would serve if I were to be elected,” said Pukaite. “I, of course, knew at the time that write-in campaigns rarely work, but they said that was their problem and again asked whether I would serve. I never turn down an opportunity to serve so I agreed and here I am.”

An attitude of servant leadership prompted her political involvement as well as motivated her throughout 26 years of employment for the Association for Retarded Citizens.

Ozaukee Now’s Ty Schmidt recently had a chance to sit down with her to reflect on her time of service to the community.

Pukaite reflects on career in Mequon politics Steve Lettau 2017-02-02 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Jan 27, 2017

Members of the Great Lakes Community Conservation Corps at work this winter removing Buckthorn from Pukaite Woods.

The mission of the Great Lakes Community Conservation Corps is to leverage resources among Great Lakes communities to train and educate disadvantaged populations for credentials that close the skills gap, improve water quality, build habitat, grow the legacy of the original Civilian Conservation Corps of the 1930s and make the region more competitive in the global economy.

Great Lakes Community Conservation Corps at work in Pukaite Woods Steve Lettau 2017-01-27 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Jan 26, 2017

If you’re new to MT Sunrise Rotary, or were not at the August 12th meeting when our District Governor visited MT Sunrise, or were not able to make the One Rotary Summit at MATC in November, or if you just want to do a make-up at the Mequon-Milwaukee Rotary Afterhours Club, then please join AG Terry Schacht at the Anchorage when he introduces DG Julie.

Mequon-Milwaukee Rotary Afterhours's meetings start at 6:00pm, but many arrive around 5:30pm to socialize. DG Julie will address the club and discuss Rotary International’s three most important goals, provide a Polio update, personally invite you to the District Conference and share many more important items.

Meet and Hear DG Julie Craig on Thursday, February 2 Steve Lettau 2017-01-26 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Jan 26, 2017

By Erik S. Hanley

Mequon — The Logemann Community Center, which has been part of the community since 1988, has two possible futures: a portion could be a restaurant or the whole building could be demolished.

The Mequon common council, meeting as the Committee of the Whole, discussed these options for the site at 6100 W. Mequon Road on Jan. 10.

The Logemann Community Center closed down Dec. 31, 2015, due to decreasing revenue. The city reached out in June to developers for bids to demolish the site, which would include the center itself, an old Department of Public Works radio tower, and a 4,600-gallon buried water tank.

Following that, two proposals are now on the table.

Two proposals reviewed for Logemann Center Steve Lettau 2017-01-26 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Jan 23, 2017

John Haut receives Paul Harris award at MT Sunrise Rotary’s 2017 Holiday Party. Pictured left to right Brian Monroe, Steve Peterman and John Haut. (Photo by Bob Blazich)

John Haut Receives Paul Harris Award Steve Lettau 2017-01-23 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Jan 23, 2017

Gary Ross speaks to MT Sunrise Rotary club on Lifestriders, a equine assisted therapy program. (Photo by Bob Blazich)

Lifestriders Presentation Steve Lettau 2017-01-23 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Jan 19, 2017

Be a POW

Asher Schroeder
Rotary Club of Maquoketa, Iowa

I was 18 when I was drafted. I turned 19 in Europe. I landed in Normandy a week after the D-Day invasion as a replacement for casualties that occurred during the initial assault. I was a part of the liberation of Paris on 25 August 1944. That November, I was with a group of soldiers that was surrounded for four days by Germans in the Hürtgen Forest in Germany. I had been wounded and was lying in a foxhole. We had been cut off from all supplies – ammunition, food, water, and medical supplies. The officer in charge decided to try to get the able-bodied out. They took off very early one morning and left 14 of us wounded behind. 

Later that day, German forces came through. Once they satisfied themselves that we were wounded, they told us to get back in our holes and to stay there, “as the next German group that comes through might shoot you.”

What It's Like - Be a POW Steve Lettau 2017-01-19 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Jan 19, 2017

By Erik S. Hanley

Mequon - Possible zoning code changes may shut down plans for a cell tower set to be built in a residential neighborhood in Mequon.

The proposed changes, which state non-residential structures must be as far from residential properties as they are tall, will be on the Jan. 10 common council agenda for public hearing and potential action.

"We all understand the impact of this, protecting our residential neighborhood," said Mayor Dan Abendroth.

Mequon council weighs location of cell tower Steve Lettau 2017-01-19 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Jan 12, 2017

Six months in the role of President give me the opportunity to reflect on the service above self eagerly undertaken by our members. It is said that the most precious gift you can give is time. When you give of your time, you give a little of yourself and a part of your life to someone else. Time in the service of others is what defines all Rotarians. This is especially true for Rotarians who are members of the Mequon-Thiensville Sunrise Rotary who are positive people driven to serve.

We began our 2016-2017 journey with the much-enjoyed Changing of the Guard event which had a tropical theme and saw one of our new members do a wonderful limbo move. We learned from the many excellent speakers. We prepared a meal for the residents of Advocates of Ozaukee County and held a children’s toys collection. All time well spent.

Many members spent a great deal of time preparing, organizing and running Lobstefrest. This was our most successful fundraiser. The results are evidence of the very generous business and individuals in our region. The funds raised will be distributed among several organizations in our region and worldwide.

At the half time mark of this fiscal year, we held our Rotary Holiday Party. This was a fun filled evening well planned by members of Club Service.

Many heartfelt thanks to all who continue to be engaged in all activities, your presence is essential and your time is invaluable.

 

Lucia Francis
Club President

Special Acknowledgement – From Changing of The Guard to Holiday Party 2017 Steve Lettau 2017-01-12 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Jan 12, 2017

From Rotary District 6270 Website

Several years ago at the International Conference in Australia, two members from the Rotary Action Group Against Slavery and Trafficking gave a presentation about slavery in India and around the world. They specifically talked about a village in Pradesh, India.  

The total population of the hamlet was 400 – 132 of them were enslaved and others were at risk of debt bondage because of dire poverty. Only 203 individuals in the community knew how to write their name and most were illiterate and innumerate. Five children were enrolled in school but did not attend as they work with their parents instead.  Their economic condition was dire. People were landless, and enslaved in debt bondage at the slaveholder’s farm doing construction projects or working in brick kilns. Some family members including children have been trafficked to other states.

After the conference representatives from The Rotary Club of Binghamton met with Carol Metzger one of the presenters at the conference and with the help of an organization call School4Freedom was able to apply for a district international grant to help the village two years ago. 

The following progress report was recently sent.

The School4Freedom in India process is now underway – a school is built, kids are attending (some from families who are illiterate and innumerate), a solar streetlamp has been installed, hot lunches are being served and six kids were rescued from slavery in a brick kiln and are now attending the school. The rest of the village is slowly being educated so they are ready to demand their own freedom and be self-sufficient at the end of the 3-year process.

Your Rotary donation made this possible. 

Thank you.

Your Rotary Donation Made This Possible Steve Lettau 2017-01-12 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Jan 10, 2017

Ride a scooter across the Sahara

Ahmad Elzoghby
Rotary Club of Alexandria Cosmopolitan, Egypt

Back in 2011, not many people were riding scooters here. But the car traffic where we lived in Alexandria was insane, so I and a few friends started to ride scooters as an alternative means of transportation.

One day a friend recommended that we do a tour around Egypt, from where we live in Alexandria to Sharm el-Sheikh, which is 450 miles away. And I said, why not? A few days later, I thought, why not go from the very north of Egypt to the very eastern border, then go south and visit all the tourist sights? Egypt depends mainly on tourism, and at this time tourism was suffering because of the recent Egyptian revolution. So we thought we would do this to tell the world that Egypt is still a safe place to visit: We can tour the country on scooters and still be safe.

What It's Like - Ride a scooter across the Sahara Steve Lettau 2017-01-10 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Jan 05, 2017

When you sit down to enjoy a beer, you probably don't spend a lot of time thinking about one of its main ingredients – water. Or the fact that 3,000 children die each day from diseases caused by unsafe water.

A group of innovative Rotarians aren't just thinking; they're doing something about it.

Their group, Beers Rotarians Enjoy Worldwide (BREW), has organized events around the world and is working to raise hundreds of thousands of dollars for Rotary's global water, sanitation, and hygiene efforts.

"By drinking a beer, I can help bring fresh water to a village in Africa," says Steven Lack, a member of the Rotary Club of Pleasant Hill, California, USA. "If you can drink beer and some of the money goes to doing good in the world, that is something you can feel good about."

Fellowships like BREW are Rotary's way of bringing together members who share a particular passion. Rotarian Action Groups unite members who have expertise in a specific service area. The beer fellowship's leaders realized that joining forces with an action group dedicated to providing access to clean water would create a sum larger than the two parts.

"Beer and water have a natural affinity; you need water to brew beer" says Moses Aryee, past president of the Rotary Club of Accra-West, Ghana, and co-chair of the beer fellowship. "Our vision is a global approach to fresh water around the world, because beer is around the world."

Rotary Members Link Love Of Beer, Clean Water Crisis Steve Lettau 2017-01-05 06:00:00Z 0
What Is Rotary? Steve Lettau 2016-12-29 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Dec 29, 2016

Dear Members of the Mequon Thiensville Sunrise Rotary,

Thank you so much for your recent very generous donation of $3,000 to support the work of the Guatemala Medical Resources Partnership in Guatemala. Your continuing support of this mission is so vital and so very much appreciated, as are the team members that you are supporting! We are very excited to be planning our 13th trip for January of 2017 and are glad to have you as a partner in this humanitarian effort.

Our trip in January of 2016 was GMRP’s 12th mission to bring medical, dental and vision care to the people of Oliveros, Guatemala. Although each of our volunteer doctors, dentists, interpreters and helpers pays over $1,000 of their own money for transportation, room and board, it is up to donors like you--Rotary Clubs, churches and other organizations, and caring people--to fund the cost of the clinic itself and to pay for continuing surgical care for patients after we leave.

We are so grateful for your choosing to donate to our ongoing GMRP mission and Continuing Care Project. I hope you will take pride in knowing that your gi  is helping to maintain and improve the health of the rural poor in Guatemala and change lives for the better.

Please visit our website www.gmrp.org to see a short video and learn many more interesting facts about our mission and its work. Remember we are always looking for more medical providers and interpreters to  fill out our team and appreciate your spreading the word among your members and acquaintances.

Once again, many thanks for your loving hearts and generous help,

 

Barbara O’Connell, Financial Secretary, GMRP

A Note From The Guatemala Medical Resources Partnership Steve Lettau 2016-12-29 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Dec 29, 2016

The Mequon Police Department is asking everyone to “Be a Hero” by donating blood at the Department’s blood drive from 7 to 11 a.m. Friday Dec. 30.

The blood drive will be held in the lower level of the department, 11300 N. Buntrock Ave., and participants should use the Public Meeting entrance on Mequon Road.

Donors, who must be in good health and at least 17 years old, will receive a long-sleeved t-shirt and refreshments will be provided.

The department recommends making appointments — donors can sign up by going to www.bcw.edu/meqpd or by calling 877-232-4376 to register or have questions answered.

Mequon police to host blood drive Steve Lettau 2016-12-29 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Dec 22, 2016

The Board of Directors is pleased to announce the appointment of Michael Shay as the Secretary of the MT Sunrise Rotary Club.  Fr. Mike is a new member of the Club but he is an experienced Rotarian. He has been a member of Rotary International for over fifteen years and has held many leadership positions in Clubs located in California and Arizona.  As Secretary, Mike is the link between our club and the rest of the Rotary world.

To prepare for this position, Fr. Mike attended a webinar offered by our District 6270.  We welcome Fr. Mike to the club and to the Board. We look forwards to working together.

Fr. Michael Shay appointed Club Secretary Steve Lettau 2016-12-22 06:00:00Z 0
Visit Rotary Wisconsin Steve Lettau 2016-12-19 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Dec 19, 2016

MT Sunrise Rotary Club welcomes Jerry Gold and Pablo Gutierrez as new members. Pictured left to right are Gerry Gold, Brian Monroe, Pablo Gutierrez and Terry Schacht. (Photo by Bob Blazich)

New Members Welcomed Steve Lettau 2016-12-19 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Dec 15, 2016

volunteer ∙ [vol-uh n-teer]

noun

A person who performs a service willingly and without pay.

MT Sunrise club member Tim Hamilton along with 18 fellow Rotarians volunteer at a showing of "A Christmas Carol" at the Pabst Theater.

volunteer ∙ [vol-uh n-teer] Steve Lettau 2016-12-15 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Dec 15, 2016

By Bryan Smith - The Rotarian

The water, steel gray, muscled with hidden current, surges by in a steady itinerant push, making a sound like bacon lightly frying, or faint applause. Blue-black against the afternoon sky, the snowy peaks of the Cascades overlook the river’s basin. To stand on the cool, muddy banks, it’s hard to imagine the tears of heartache, bitterness, hostility, and despair that have been shed over this vital artery of the American West.

The 263-mile Klamath River, which stretches from Oregon to a remote corner of California, has been the object of a custody battle as ugly as any parental fight for a child. Indian tribes. Farmers. Ranchers. Fishermen. Neighbors. Environmental activists. Politicians. All have been locked in a stalemate so fraught that it has an unofficial title: the Klamath Water Wars.

Water Wars Steve Lettau 2016-12-15 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Dec 08, 2016

District Governor Julie Craig is pleased to announce that Steen Sanderhoff of the Rotary Club of Racine Founders has been selected as this district’s District Governor for the year 2019 - 2020.  

Steen is now the District Governor Nominee Designate and will become District Governor Nominee July 1, 2017. In accordance with RI & district bylaws District Governor Julie Craig will certify this to RI.

District Governor 2019-20 Selected Steve Lettau 2016-12-08 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Dec 02, 2016

John Weitzer - CFA SVP Wells Fargo was our featured speaker at this morning’s meeting. Topic, the global economic picture. (Photo: Bob Blazich)

Topic - The Global Economic Picture Steve Lettau 2016-12-02 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Dec 01, 2016

By Melanie Boyung - News Graphic Staff

OZAUKEE COUNTY  The statewide release of Department of Public Instruction school report cards show the districts of southern Ozaukee County are exceeding expectations across the board.

The Cedarburg School District received a districtwide rating of 86.8, and Mequon-Thiensville School District received 86.5; both fall into the five-star significantly exceeds expectations category of 83 or above.

The Grafton School District received an overall score of 80.7, exceeds expectations. Each district and school receives a report card, including a total rating and four section ratings.

Grafton Superintendent Jeff Nelson said the district was pro! ud all five of their schools had exceeded expectations. Woodview Elementary School scored 91.4, "significantly exceeds expectations," and was ranked 20thin the state of the about 600 elementary schools that were rated, according to Superintendent Jeff Nelson.

Area school districts exceeding goals Steve Lettau 2016-12-01 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Dec 01, 2016

Our M-T Sunrise Rotary Club has a fantastic opportunity to participate in a community service activity at the Pabst Theater next week Wednesday, December 7th. We will be working as ushers for The Christmas Carol. We need to arrive by 5:30pm. The show begins at 7:00. We will be finished by 9:00pm.

The Pabst Theater needs a final count of how many people will be participating by this Friday afternoon. Our goal is to have between 15-18 helpers from the group. You can bring your family and friends to help out as well! A big thank you goes out to Bob Blazich for organizing this project for our group! What a great way to kick off the holidays.

Please email me at jsutherland@newcastleplace.com to sign up. I will also provide a sign up sheet at our Rotary meeting this Friday morning.

Many thanks,
Jennifer Sutherland

Ushers needed for A Christmas Carol Steve Lettau 2016-12-01 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Dec 01, 2016

You and your guest(s) are warmly invited to help us share and celebrate this special time of year at our annual Holiday party on Sunday, January 8th, at the American Legion Post at 6050 W. Mequon Road.

6:00 Cocktails/Social (w/cash bar), 7:00 Dinner, 8:00 Entertainment

The cost will be $25.00 per person. Please note that we will be invoicing for the event, so please chose an option;

  • Best option – pay for your ticket(s) at one of the next meetings.
  • Better option - mail to MT Rotary, 6079 W. Mequon Road, PMB 123 Mequon 53092.
  • Good option - (with RSVP), payment at the door.
Rotary Holiday Party Steve Lettau 2016-12-01 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Dec 01, 2016

The Volunteer Center of Ozaukee, a non-profit local organization, is hosting a holiday gift drive for families right here in our county. Last year, they were able to distribute gifts to 546 children (248 families).  Our Mequon-Thiensville Sunrise Rotary Club is once again assisting their efforts with this year’s holiday giving project which gathers donations that can be utilized towards the cause. Below is an on-going list of client and organization needs.

Thank you in advance for considering the request for donating new, unused items for the sake of this local charitable organization. Please do not wrap any of the gifts. Together, we can help by taking away some of their stress during this holiday season. If you have any questions about this local organization or their work, please feel free to visit www.volunteerozaukee.org.

Items Needed:

  • Art supplies such as markers, colored pencils, paper, glue, scissors, etc.
  • Diapers, bottles, pacifiers, blankets and other baby supplies
  • Books for children of all ages
  • Toys for children of all ages (puzzles, legos, dolls, board games, etc.)
  • Winter hats, boots, mittens and scarves for children
  • Stocking stuffers (nail polish, chapstick, stickers, bookmarks, hair ties, etc.)
  • iTunes gift cards
  • Earbuds, wallets & purses for teenagers

Additionally, we understand that it might be easier to make a cash donation. If you are interested in this option, please bring your monetary donation to one of our upcoming Friday meetings on or before December 9th. We will be happy to go out and purchase items that are of the greatest need to the Volunteer Center of Ozaukee County.

Please know that there is absolutely no obligation to participate in this holiday giving project. We are simply organizing and offering this opportunity for those who would like to be involved and give back to families in need throughout Ozaukee County this holiday season. Additionally, a tax deductible letter can be given to you after your donation is made (upon request).
 
Many thanks,
Jennifer Sutherland
Community Services Committee

Supporting the Volunteer Center of Ozaukee Steve Lettau 2016-12-01 06:00:00Z 0
Breakfast with Santa Steve Lettau 2016-12-01 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Nov 17, 2016

By Dr. Francis “Tusu” Tusubira, a member of the Rotary Club of Kampala-North, Uganda

How many times do we hear Rotary members say, “we have our project in Kireberebe Kisunkaana?”

Let us get one thing right when dealing with economic and community development. And I will call this lesson one: it is not YOUR project.

It is a community project that you are supporting. Along these lines, I thought sharing a few experiential lessons is not a bad idea.

Lesson two: A community where disease is a challenge will lose so much time being sick that they cannot focus usefully on any other initiative that will help them develop. You cannot address economic and community development if you have not addressed basic health.

It’s not “your” project Steve Lettau 2016-11-17 06:00:00Z 0
Visioning Team 2016 Steve Lettau 2016-11-17 06:00:00Z 0
Annual Holiday Art & Craft Bazaar Steve Lettau 2016-11-10 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Nov 10, 2016

By Quentin Wodon, a member of the Rotary Club of Capitol Hill, Washington, D.C., USA

Let’s admit it: achieving a high growth rate (negative or positive) is easier with a small club. Still, after more than five years of almost continuous decline in membership, my club was excited to report a 60 percent growth in membership from July to October. We had 18 members on 1 July. Now we have 29, with 11 new members inducted in the first trimester of the new Rotary year.

How did we do it? Let me share our recipe:

  • Ingredient 1: Less meetings, more service and public events. Rotary’s Council on Legislation has given a lot of freedom to clubs on how they organize their meetings. So we decided to reduce our regular meetings from four to two per month, which gives us more time for service work and organizing public events.
  • Ingredient 2: Better service opportunities. Many Rotarians are professionals and business leaders, yet most do not use their skills when they volunteer with their club. We changed that in our club by creating teams of Rotarians and non-Rotarians combining their skills to provide free advice to local nonprofits on the strategic issues they face. This is not only more interesting in terms of volunteer work, but it is also more impactful to create positive change in the community.
  • Ingredient 3: Lower cost. By the standards of Washington D.C., our membership dues are not very high, at $600 per year. But this is too much for many. So we created two new membership types – a membership at half the regular dues for young professionals under 35 years of age, and a spouse/partner membership at one third of the dues.
  • Ingredient 4: Stronger public image. We are organizing better and more regular public events. One of our recent events was a seminar at the World Bank with great speakers on education for peace and social change. That same week we also had a stand at the main festival in our neighborhood. In addition, we have been writing articles for a local blog, the local magazine for our neighborhood in Washington, D.C., and a free newspaper.
  • Ingredient 5: Strategic planning. We now have a strategic plan, our first since the club’s creation in 2003. The plan gives us a vision, and clear milestones and targets that we are trying to achieve.
  • Ingredient 6: Luck. Part of our gain in membership was just luck, as two new members transferred from other clubs due to changes in jobs and the location of their workplace. What’s great is that they bring with them a lot of experience in Rotary.

It remains to be seen whether we will continue on the path of membership growth for the rest of the year. We expect some members to relocate, so we will need to recruit more members to compensate. But we are making progress, and we have exciting initiatives coming up that should help us become better known in the community, make a larger difference for the less fortunate, and hopefully continue to grow.

About the author: Quentin Wodon is a lead economist at the World Bank. He holds PhDs in economics and in theology and religious studies, and has taught at universities in Europe and the U.S. He is currently President of the Rotary Club of Capitol Hill, in Washington, D.C. He is also author of the Rotarian Economist blog.

6 ingredients for membership growth Steve Lettau 2016-11-10 06:00:00Z 0
2016 General Election Dashboard Steve Lettau 2016-11-08 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Nov 04, 2016

Lance Parve - Sr. Project Engineer at the Wisconsin Department Of Transportation speaks to our club this morning on the topic "Innovations in Design and Construction at WisDOT". (Photo: Bob Blazich)

Innovations in Design and Construction at WisDOT Steve Lettau 2016-11-04 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Nov 04, 2016

Father Mike Shay is welcomed into our club at Friday’s meeting. Pictured left to right: Brian Monroe (sponsor), Fr. Mike Shay and Terry Schacht.

Welcome Fr. Mike Shay Steve Lettau 2016-11-04 05:00:00Z 0
Save the Date Steve Lettau 2016-11-03 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Nov 03, 2016

By Nancy Wright Beasley, a polio survivor and member of the Rotary Club of Brandermill, Virginia, USA

I thought I’d never walk again, but I did.

I thought I’d never talk about polio either, but I’ve regularly shared my childhood memories of the disease since joining the Rotary Club of Brandermill in 2005. I had been  invited to speak about my first book, Izzy’s Fire. That’s where I first learned about PolioPlus, and decided  that day to join Rotary International’s fight to eradicate the disease. I often say that I’m the only speaker who gave a speech then never left.

I contracted polio in the summer of 1952, in the middle of one of the worst epidemics in U.S. history.

Some 60,000 people nationwide were infected, killing 3,000 and paralyzing 21,000 others. My brother still remembers the summer day when he found me, the youngest of four children, unconscious under a snowball bush just beside our farm house in Christiansburg, Virginia.

A spinal tap at Roanoke’s Memorial and Crippled Children’s Hospital confirmed a diagnosis of polio. At 6, I had never spent a night away from my family, but I was isolated in a sterile room, seen only by medical personnel swathed in gowns and masks. I cried with joy the first time a nurse wheeled me into the sunroom where my mother placed her hand on a glass partition opposite mine. A prisoner of polio —I talked to her by telephone.

I thought I’d never walk again Steve Lettau 2016-11-03 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Oct 28, 2016

Danielle Deller (left) is welcomed into our club at our Friday meeting. Bob Leonhardt (center) and Elizabeth Suran (right) are Danielle’s co-sponsors. Photo: Bob Blazich.

Danielle Deller becomes our newest member Steve Lettau 2016-10-28 05:00:00Z 0
2016 Haunted Halloween Photo Gallery Steve Lettau 2016-10-27 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Oct 27, 2016

The great city of Atlanta suffered extensive damage during the Civil War, and many of its prewar structures were lost. However, stories of Georgia’s nearly 300-year history abound – you just have to know where to find them.

Only a short ride from the site of the 2017 Rotary International Convention, 10-14 June, lies Oakland Cemetery, where you’ll find monuments dedicated to Confederate soldiers and the graves of famous locals, including golf great Bobby Jones and “Gone with the Wind” author Margaret Mitchell. Tours of the 48-acre space are available. 

Speaking of Mitchell, her former home – where she wrote her Pulitzer Prize-winning novel – still stands in midtown Atlanta. Across town at the Atlanta History Center, you’ll find more historic homes to tour, including a Civil War-era farmhouse and a cabin that dates to Atlanta’s earliest days.

An hour and a half away, in Macon, Ocmulgee National Monument offers the chance to journey even further into Georgia’s past: The prehistoric American Indian site is said to represent 17,000 years of continuous human habitation.

If Rotary history is what interests you, you won’t have to go far. The 1917 Rotary Convention was held in the Baptist Tabernacle, today a concert venue known simply as the Tabernacle, a short distance from the Fountain of Rings in Centennial Olympic Park.

Register for the 2017 Rotary Convention in Atlanta at riconvention.org.

2017 Rotary Convention: Old-School Atlanta Steve Lettau 2016-10-27 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Oct 27, 2016

Learn how to log in to your ClubRunner account in this video.

Forgot your password? Never knew you even had a password? No problem.

Watch this space for future "How Do I?" articles.

How do I login to my ClubRunner account? Steve Lettau 2016-10-27 05:00:00Z 0
“Why not here?” “Why not us?” “Why not now?” - Joe Dean Steve Lettau 2016-10-21 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Oct 20, 2016

Interfaith Caregivers of Ozaukee County
Invites you to the 2016 Fall Fundraiser

Support our Seniors: Celebrating Twenty-Three Years of Service in Ozaukee County

Keynote Speaker Craig Thompson,
Executive Director Transportation Development Assoc. of WI
presenting
“The Transportation Challenges of Seniors”

Master of Ceremonies
Representative Jim Ott
,
Wisconsin State Assembly, District 23

Thursday, November 10, 2016
5:00 pm — 7:00 pm
Drinks & Heavy Hors d’oeuvres
followed by a short program
$35 / person

Ozaukee Country Club
10823 North River Road, 43 W
Mequon, WI

More information and order tickets ...

Interfaith Caregivers of Ozaukee County - 2016 Fall Fundraiser Steve Lettau 2016-10-20 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Oct 20, 2016

Stars and Stripes Honor Flight Inc. was started in 2008 by Joe Dean and a merry band of volunteers, after Dean had seen a brief national news segment (See National Honor Flight Story below). Joe recalls thinking, “someone should do this in Wisconsin.” The next day Dean, son of a WWII Hero (David Dean, US Navy), woke up with one overwhelming thought: “Oh man, I should do this in Wisconsin!”

Within days, the Stars and Stripes Honor Flight wheels were in motion. Recruiting the busiest people he knew, Dean asked each potential board member three questions: “Why not here?” “Why not us?” “Why not now?”.  

The Stars and Stripes Honor Flight Board of Directors became a reality and the board booked the first flight at their second meeting, with a grand total of $250.00 in the bank. The Stars and Stripes Honor Flight story was told one person, one small group at a time, and grew from tiny fundraisers to partnerships with many local organizations and individuals, who have all stepped forward to ensure that our WWII and Korean War Veterans feel appreciated.

To date, Stars and Stripes Honor Flight has flown over 4,500 veterans. Our community has been phenomenal in its support, and we are forever grateful.

Friday's Speaker - Amy Luft (VP Stars & Stripes Honor Flight) Steve Lettau 2016-10-20 05:00:00Z 0
Tracy Hames - Exec. Director Wisconsin Wetlands Preservation featured speaker Steve Lettau 2016-10-14 05:00:00Z 0
Be The Miracle Steve Lettau 2016-10-14 05:00:00Z 0
They Won’t Give Up Steve Lettau 2016-10-13 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Oct 13, 2016

From the October 2016 issue of The Rotarian

I was having breakfast in my local diner the morning after the Oscars when I happened to mention how surprised I was that Spotlight …

I did not get to finish the sentence.

“Don’t tell me who won,” said a regular at the table, frantically waving his hands. “I recorded it, but I haven’t had a chance to watch it yet.”

The response was immediate.

“Too bad!” said one of the other members of the breakfast club.

“Tough break,” said another.

“Nice try,” chimed in a third.

“Spoiler alerts don’t apply to the Oscars,” said a fourth. “If you didn’t see the show in real time, too bad.”

“As I was saying,” I continued, “I was pleasantly surprised to see Spotlight win the Oscar for best picture.”

And the conversation went on from there.

Similarly, no one has the right to say, “Don’t tell me how the Super Bowl ended!” or “Don’t wreck the World Series for me; I still haven’t seen game three.” If you haven’t seen the Super Bowl or the World Series in real time, that’s your problem.

Culture: Social Niceties Gone Bad Steve Lettau 2016-10-13 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Oct 13, 2016

From the October 2016 issue of The Rotarian

Hundreds of people gather in an open-air courtyard at University Central Hospital in Kigali, Rwanda. Men in suits, women in flowered dresses, even prisoners in pink and orange gowns are waiting to find out if they will receive medical care. Some have no visible signs of injury. Others arrived on crutches, with arms in slings, or with catheters protruding from their clothing. Several have swollen, broken limbs: injuries that should have been mended long ago but were neglected because of the country’s long surgical-ward backlog, or simply poverty.

Emmanuel Mugatyawe, 36, sits on the ground as a friend fills out his yellow admissions form. He has been waiting two months for an operation to repair a broken leg – now infected – that he sustained when a car plowed into his motorbike.

“These are not routine cases; there are very few fresh injuries,” says Shashank Karvekar, an orthopedic surgeon and member of the Rotary Club of Solapur, India, after he and his Rwandan colleague Joel Bikoroti examine several dozen patients, scheduling many for surgery. Over the next eight days, a team of 18 specialized doctors (12 of whom are Rotarians) will perform surgeries on 268 Rwandan patients, including procedures in orthopedics and urology. The trip, initiated by District 3080 (India) and hosted by District 9150 (Central Africa), is funded by The Rotary Foundation with support from the Rwandan government. It’s the fourth medical mission to Rwanda that the two districts have organized since 2012. This time, among the volunteers is K.R. Ravindran, the first sitting RI president to take part in the mission.

Surgeons From India Bring Relief To Underserved Patients In Rwanda Steve Lettau 2016-10-13 05:00:00Z 0
2015 Top Adult Halloween Costumes Steve Lettau 2016-10-12 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Oct 07, 2016

Rev. Dr. Patrick Ferry, President of Concordia University Wisconsin was the guest speaker at this morning’s meeting.

CUW President Featured Speaker Steve Lettau 2016-10-07 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Oct 06, 2016

Please Note-Club Visioning Session on Thursday 10 Nov Replacing Friday 11 Nov Meeting

Back by popular request is Club Visioning. This fast paced four hour workshop is an investment in the continued health and vitality of our Rotary Club. This Rotary "best practice" session will be facilitated by D6270 Rotarians PDG Tamie Koop, AG Steve Affeldt and past Membership Chair Lee Prellwitz. We will conduct this at MATC North starting at 5:00pm and running until 9:00pm (yes if we are organized and serious we could conclude earlier than that). Food and beverages (non-alcoholic) will be provided since this will act as a replacement for our regular Friday meeting.

In order for this to a successful and beneficial investment of our and our facilitator’s time we ask all members active and even those on LOA to complete the RVQ (Rotary Visioning Questionnaire) survey. This is a comprehensive survey that is more impactful when all members complete it. It is only used by the facilitation team to know areas that may require more attention and then shared with President Lucia and PE Cindy to get a better understanding of the member’s views. I will be sending the RVQ out on 10 Oct and will need them ideally completed by 21 Oct.

We realize that 100% participation on 10 Nov is not possible. But we do know that there are many members who will make the commitment to participate and be an integral part of the important task of shaping our club’s future. We ask that all Officers and Avenue of Service Chairs be part of this session. We also encourage as many new and long term members as possible to participate. This is where new ideas can be shared without the stigma of hearing “oh we have already tried that and it didn’t work” being said. So bring an open mind and the spirit of collaboration and let’s see where it takes us.

Please direct any questions to Brian Monroe monroe.earthbound@gmail.com or 414.881.6901. I’ll also request a headcount and any dietary requirements for the food order.

Thanks,

Brian Monroe

Club Visioning Session set for Thursday 10 Nov Steve Lettau 2016-10-06 05:00:00Z 0
Encore Performance - 2016 Lobsterfest Video Steve Lettau 2016-10-05 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Oct 04, 2016

Our community services committee is joining forces with the Volunteer Center of Ozaukee County for their personal toiletries drive. When you make a stop at the grocery store or pharmacy next, would you take a moment to consider picking up an item or two?

All donations will be collected at our Friday meetings throughout the month of October. 

Items include: toothbrushes/toothpaste, deodorant, shampoo, razors, feminine hygiene products, soap, body wash, lotion, etc.

For more information, please visit: www.volunteerozaukee.org

Thank You,

 

Jennifer Sutherland
Community Services Committee

MT Sunrise Rotary launches personal toiletries drive Steve Lettau 2016-10-04 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Sep 30, 2016

Lisa Holtebeck - Executive Director of Ozaukee Family Services addresses MT Sunrise Rotary’s Friday meeting.

Ozaukee Family Services meets the needs of children, families and seniors through dedicated, compassionate, and caring staff and volunteers. We serve those in need by offering programs in family education and prevention, as well as counseling and senior services. (Photo: Bob Blazich)

Lisa Holtebeck featured at club meeting Steve Lettau 2016-09-30 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Sep 29, 2016

Are you new to our Rotary club, or do you still have questions about Rotary and our club, or are you considering joining our Rotary club?

If you answered yes to any of these questions, then this upcoming "Fireside Chat” is right for you. Please contact Brian Monroe at monroe.earthbound@gmail.com or text 414-881-6901 and sign up for this fun fulfilled low keyed new member orientation. 

This will be hosted by new member Sean Zalewski at his home at 12650 N. Lake Shore Dr. on Tuesday 11 October from 5:30pm-7:00pm. Snacks and beverages will be provided. Tom Martin along with Brian Monroe will conducting this session.

This orientation is also great for sponsors and spouses too. So bring your curiosity and rest assured your questions are encouraged, welcomed and will be answered.

Yes this qualifies as a “make-up” and is one of the items on the “New Member Checklist” that can be checked off that evening.

Brian Monroe

Invitation-"Fireside Chat” Tuesday 11 October Steve Lettau 2016-09-29 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Sep 29, 2016

By Carolyn Johnson, Vice-Chair of the Literacy Rotarian Action Group and member of the Rotary Club of Yarmouth, Maine, USA

Recently, I visited a small government school outside Kampala, Uganda. The school is located on the edge of a growing community, but most of these students live in a small nearby fishing village.

Many of the children were barefoot and dressed in what they could assemble of the school uniform. The school is basic: a concrete floor, block walls and a tin roof- but clean and neat, with all the children wearing broad smiles and clearly happy to be in school with caring and supportive teachers. The first time I visited this school, it was a very different sight. 

Just three years ago, the school was a tiny building of three cramped classrooms – no doors and no windows. Each teacher taught two grades without books and education materials. That day, children weren’t attending classes, but a cow had made itself at home in the school: tipping over benches, knocking down the old blackboard with its horns, and doing what cows do. It was not surprising that parents didn’t enroll their children in school.  It just didn’t seem worthwhile.

How Rotary is providing opportunities for a brighter future Steve Lettau 2016-09-29 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Sep 26, 2016

Oct 13, 2016 6:00 PM – 9:30 PM

River Club of Mequon, WI
12400 N Ville Du Parc Dr,
Mequon, WI 53092

6:00 PM   Hors d'oeuvres, cash bar & raffles 

7:30 PM   Comedy provided by Mark Schiff 

Mark Schiff has been working a working comedian for over 30  years.  He is currently on tour with Jerry Seinfeld and just recently worked with Jay Leno. He has appeared many times on both The Tonight Show with Jay Leno and Late Night with David Letterman.

Open seating - $50
Reserved Table for 10 - $600

Get together with friends and take advantage of sitting closer to the action.

Contact Ellen MacFarlane: rmacfarlane@wi.rr.com

Fall Into Comedy Night Steve Lettau 2016-09-26 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Sep 22, 2016

A new video celebrates Rotary International and its members, vowing that "There's no limit to what we can do."

No Limit Steve Lettau 2016-09-22 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Sep 16, 2016

James Davies - Executive Director and Caressa Givens - Community Engagement Coordinator from Bublr Bikes, a Milwaukee bike share program, were the speakers at our Friday meeting.

For more information on how this Milwaukee bike share program works, check out their website bublrbikes.com. (Photo: Bob Blazich)

Bublr Bikes is another way to get around Milwaukee. Steve Lettau 2016-09-16 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Sep 15, 2016

Celebrate fall at the Jonathan Clark House
On the corner of Bonniwell & Cedarburg Roads in Mequon
Sunday, September 25, 11:00 – 4:00

Music by Lil’ Rev

Docent led house tours ● Creekside Valley Farm Pumpkin Wagon
Enjoy local food and refreshments ● Fun at the “Kid’s Tent”
Bring a few lawn chairs or a blanket ● No carry-ins, please

Parking on Bonniwell Road just west of Cedarburg Road
Handicap and drop off parking in JCH lot on Cedarburg Road
This is a dog friendly event

Thank you to our Presenting Sponsor:
Fromm Family Pet Food

Thank you to our Supporting Sponsors:
Shaffer Development
Spectrum Investment Advisors
The Kubala Washatko Architects

For more information call 262-618-2051 or e-mail jchmuseum@gmail.com
Event Location:  13615 N. Cedarburg Road, Mequon

Celebrate fall at the Jonathan Clark House Steve Lettau 2016-09-15 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Sep 14, 2016

Our Community Services committee is planning to assist with food preparation/serving at the 7th annual Mel’s Pig Roast which will support the Family Enrichment Center of Ozaukee County on Sept. 25 at Cedar’s in Cedarburg.

The time slot is 1:30-3:30pm. We are in need of 4-5 Rotary members who can commit to helping out.

Please email Jennifer at jsutherland@newcastleplace.com if interested.

Volunteers Needed Steve Lettau 2016-09-14 05:00:00Z 0
Remember 9/11 Steve Lettau 2016-09-09 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Sep 08, 2016

By Luca Della Volta, Charter President of Rotary E-Club 2042 Italia and 2016-17 Service Projects Committee Chair.

I wanted to write about how much love and support Rotary is bringing to the areas of Italy devastated by the recent earthquake. But my words fail me, so I have to first write from the heart about what I have seen.

I feel as if death has entered me. My lungs inhale the dust of the earth. My feet walk amid debris. My hands touch stone that suddenly gave way, smashing hopes and dreams.

I trudge through streets where, a few days earlier, joyful children were walking with their grandparents, spending time during their summer vacation in the town where their parents grew up before moving on to start a family elsewhere.

Geraniums which once brought joy now are a sad reminder of a happy home that is no more. Outside, near the rubble-strewn lawn, is a crushed car, parked by the driver who returned home a few hours before the earthquake.

The faces of the people reflect pain and their skin bears the marks of devastation. Eyes roam about looking for something to bring peace of mind, but our thoughts are weighed down by those who are no longer here.

In the small village of Saletta, a family’s mailbox which used to hold letters from loved ones remains attached to a gate that now serves as a fragile barrier against trespassers. But you can still see inside the courtyard where among the debris sits a crushed car and two knotted sheets hanging from a window, sheets that helped two people escape to safety.

Reflections from earthquake stricken Italy Steve Lettau 2016-09-08 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Sep 01, 2016

A 6.2-magnitude earthquake struck central Italy early Wednesday, killing more than 240 people and trapping an unknown number beneath rubble. Tremors were felt as far away as Rome, 100 km (65 miles) southwest of the quake's epicenter.

International disaster relief agency and Rotary International project partner ShelterBox is sending a response team from its headquarters in the United Kingdom to the remote mountainous area of Italy where the destruction is most severe. The response team will arrive Friday, 26 August, to assess the area's needs.

Luca Della Volta, president of ShelterBox Italia, the affiliate organization in Genoa, will accompany the response team. Della Volta is working with the Rotary Club of Rieti in District 2080, the club closest to the earthquake-affected sites, and will meet with officials of the Italian Civil Protection Department, fire department, and Red Cross to coordinate efforts.

If families and individuals made homeless by the disaster need emergency shelter, ShelterBox will send tents and other equipment from its locations in Italy and other sites across Europe. Della Volta says the most urgent need is for tents and relief supplies for the hospital of Rieti, where most of the patients from the destroyed hospital in Amatrice were taken.

"I am truly heartbroken over what has happened," says Della Volta, charter president of the Rotary E-Club of 2042 Italia. "As Rotarians, we are always available to help people in need."

Shelter Box and Rotary Clubs Take Action Following Earthquake in Italy Steve Lettau 2016-09-01 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Sep 01, 2016

From the September 2016 issue of The Rotarian

You may be surprised to learn that in 1905, when Rotary began, it was not based on the idea of Service Above Self. Instead, the two main aims of the Chicago club were “the promotion of the business interests of its members” and “good fellowship and other desiderata ordinarily incident to Social Clubs.”

But for Paul Harris, that wasn’t enough. He wanted a club that would get involved in civic affairs and benefit the community. 

A prospective member, Chicago attorney Donald Carter, had been “struck by the selfish character of the organization,” according to Harris biographer Fred A. Carvin. The two conspired to introduce a Third Object of Rotary: “the advancement of the best interests of Chicago.” As Harris later remembered, “I concluded that the most practical method of introducing community service would be to find a worthy cause and then induce members to work for it.”

The club began by buying a horse for a farmer whose animal had died. Members also provided a newsboy with a suit of warm clothes. All along, Harris was planning bigger things, creating a committee to find civic projects for Rotary to participate in. The first issue it addressed was the lack of public restrooms downtown. There was only one choice at the time – a saloon. Once there, it was said, men could be tempted to take a drink or two. As for women, entering such an establishment was simply out of the question.

So Harris and his committee persuaded the Chicago City Council to fund public facilities to the tune of $20,000 (almost $500,000 today) in taxpayer money. And Chicago Rotarians got so much satisfaction out of seeing their work get results that “Service Above Self” became an operating principle, although it didn’t become one of our official mottoes until 1950.

Service: The Motives Behind Motivation Steve Lettau 2016-09-01 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Sep 01, 2016

Brenda Peterson of the Volunteer Center of Ozaukee County wants to see if a small group of Rotarians would like to participate in a fundraising event they have coming up in November called “Let’s Dance Lip Sync.” She said that the Cedarburg-Grafton Rotary group will be participating and it might be healthy competition between the two Rotary groups.

For more information contact Jennifer Sutherland at jsutherland@newcastleplace.com.

Volunteer Center Fund Raising Event Steve Lettau 2016-09-01 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Aug 25, 2016

I feel that there are are many creative and talented people reading this newsletter. I’m also sure that many of you have hidden talents and skills that others would appreciate an opportunity to experience. Well here is an opportunity for you to turn that appreciation into an auction item at Lobsterfest and leverage your gift of time and talent into doing good in the world.

In the past some of our highest auction bid items at Lobsterfest have come from services provided by members, family and friends. From special themed meals prepared, hosting at vacation homes, yard work, vehicle detailing, hosted tours, sporting events, custom made items (ex.golf clubs) and unique social events. These service items are not found on websites or in brick and mortar buildings, these items come from the heart and are treasured by those who purchase and enjoy them.

So please consider sharing that special gift that you have, you’ll feel good giving it. Please let me know (monroe.earthbound@gmail.com) and I’ll pass it on.

Brian Monroe

Calling All Members and Friends - Requesting Help with LF Auction Items Steve Lettau 2016-08-25 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Aug 25, 2016

Rotary provides many great opportunities for us to learn, grow and improve ourselves and one of them is through the RYE (Rotary Youth Exchange) program. Many of us in our club and the TM Noon club have had the wonderful and rewarding opportunity to be host parents to high school students from many different countries. The RYE students provide us with an opportunity to see our country and community through their eyes and at the same time they share their unique cultural differences and insights with us. We both come away with a better understanding and appreciation of our differences and similarities.

Nancy and our family were hosts to Cristina Sancen from Mexico 14 years ago. We’ve had an opportunity to follow her accomplishments over the years and we reconnected with her in Quebec in 2006. We were very happy for her when she got engaged and thrilled to be invited to her wedding. We were more than wedding guests, we were introduced and treated as her parents from the USA. It was a beautiful wedding culturally different from anything we’ve ever experienced.

We thank Rotary for this great gift and encourage others to consider becoming a host family or really getting to know a RYE student when they are here visiting us. It’s really is beneficial to all concerned.

Brian Monroe

Thanks Rotary Steve Lettau 2016-08-25 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Aug 18, 2016

Erik S. Hanley, ehanley@gannett.com

“We haven’t fully developed this yet,” Ernst said.  “We’re very conceptual.”

Cindy Shaffer, owner of Shaffer Development, said she's had weekly meetings with staff working on the project since January.

She added that with the current parking issues at the Town Center now, she was worried about parking at the new development.  Therefore, the developer is proposing 10 spaces per 1,000 square feet instead of the standard five.

Mequon Town Center may be expanding Steve Lettau 2016-08-18 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Aug 18, 2016

By Evan Burrell, a member of the Rotary Club of Turramurra, New South Wales, Australia

As a former member of Rotaract and now a young Rotarian, I get asked quite a lot, “where do we find more young members like you?”

It may seem like young members are as elusive to catch as Pokémon, but with the right strategy and awareness, it’s not that difficult at all. The truth is, they are really all around us. They may be in your work place, they may be in your neighborhood, or they may be in those other social gatherings you belong to. Others may be active in our youth programs like Rotaract and RYLA, readying themselves for the challenges that lie ahead.

Attracting new members is pretty critical to our clubs. They are the lifeblood of our organization, bringing in fresh ideas and insights, and keeping our clubs alive and relevant. In turn, young professionals seek a sense of purpose and belonging, and this is exactly what your club can give them.

As we celebrate Membership Month in Rotary, here are my tips for attracting younger members

  1. Don’t go too crazy at first. If the average age of your club is over 60, begin by trying to attract members in their 40’s and 50’s and work from there.
  2. Use your age differences to your advantage. Stress the opportunity for career mentoring and set up mentoring programs pairing members with vast experience with those just beginning their careers.
  3. Make sure you welcome new members into your club. At meetings, assign a seasoned veteran to each new member to be their host and introduce them to everyone else in your club. In time, the newcomer will get a better feel for the club.
  4. Use social media (Twitter, Facebook). Let’s face it, anyone under 30 is on social media 24/7. So use it to your club’s advantage by promoting your activities and what you do in the community.
  5. Sponsor participants for our young leaders programs. College or university students are excellent candidates for a Rotary Youth Leadership Awards event. Sponsor a high school student for a Rotary Youth Exchange, and you not only broaden their horizons, but also make a lifelong friend of Rotary. Work alongside these future leaders of tomorrow so they become interested in your club and our organization.
  6. Keep younger, and newer, members in the loop. This one is a biggie! Don’t waste all that effort attracting new members only to forget about them and let them drift away from lack of attention. Engage them in as many ways as you can. Find out what they are interested in, and put them in charge of things that match their likes. If you have enough new members with a particular interest, start up a new program or incorporate their interests into an existing one. Make sure you give them lead roles, and give them a real opportunity to make a difference.

Member recruitment is a must for any club that wants to survive and not turn into the Rotary Club of Jurassic Park. It is not difficult, but you DO have to put some effort into it. You won’t regret the time, though, when you see your club take on new life.

Register for our webinar, Revitalize and Rethink Your Rotary Club on Wednesday, 24 August, at 11:00 Chicago time.

Where are all the young members? Steve Lettau 2016-08-18 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Aug 11, 2016

EVANSTON, Ill. (July 26, 2016) — Rotary and disaster relief charity ShelterBox renewed a three-year agreement to provide immediate, lifesaving assistance to survivors of natural disasters and conflict.

Rotary clubs worldwide have mobilized to provide immediate relief to thousands of displaced people quickly and efficiently with ShelterBox for 16 years. To date, Rotary members have donated US$48 million to provide shelter for families in need – 40 percent of ShelterBox's total of US$119.6 million raised.

"The partnership between Rotary and ShelterBox has provided a place of refuge to people facing some of the most difficult and uncertain moments in their lives," said John Hewko, general secretary of Rotary. "We are happy to renew this project partnership and honor our ongoing commitment to taking action to help communities devastated by disasters and conflict."

Each ShelterBox container typically provides a tent designed to withstand extreme weather conditions, along with regionally-appropriate supplies such as a water purification kit, blankets, tools, solar lights, and other necessities to help a family survive for six months or more after a disaster.

As part of the communities they serve, Rotary clubs help ShelterBox identify and prioritize immediate relief needs in disaster-affected areas and assist with the deployment of shelter kits, education materials and lifesaving supplies. Rotary members also fund aid boxes, become trained relief volunteers, assist with shipping customs clearance and connect with governments and other organizations in impacted areas to facilitate the delivery of boxes and aid. CEO of ShelterBox, Chris Warham said, "Rotary and ShelterBox will always stand side by side to help those less fortunate. This project partnership renewal simply indicates the strength of our long friendship, and recognizes the immense practical and funding support provided by Rotary members worldwide to enable us to reach out to families in distress."

About Rotary

Rotary brings together a global network of volunteers dedicated to tackling the world's most pressing humanitarian challenges. Rotary connects 1.2 million members of more than 35,000 Rotary clubs in over 200 countries and geographical areas. Their work improves lives at both the local and international levels, from helping families in need in their own communities to working toward a polio-free world. To access broadcast quality video footage and still photos go to: The Newsmarket.

About ShelterBox

ShelterBox has provided emergency shelter and lifesaving supplies for families affected by more than 270 disasters in more than 95 countries, and has already helped over 1 million beneficiaries. Based in Cornwall, United Kingdom, with 18 international affiliates, ShelterBox is an international disaster relief charity that delivers emergency shelter, warmth, and dignity to people made homeless by disasters worldwide. The agreement with Rotary reaffirms the charity's volunteer base, enhancing its capacity to respond rapidly to disasters while keeping costs low. ShelterBox teams and their distribution partners are currently operating in Ecuador, Paraguay, Sri Lanka, Niger, Cameroon, Syria and the Democratic People's Republic of Korea.

Rotary and Shelterbox renew partnership to aid disaster survivors worldwide Steve Lettau 2016-08-11 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Aug 11, 2016

From the August 2016 issue of The Rotarian

When I tell people I grew up in Palo Alto, Calif. – the epicenter of Silicon Valley – they tend to assume that I was born with a silver iPod in my mouth.

But back in the 1970s, Palo Alto was a sleepy college town. The big innovation of my boyhood was a gizmo that Alissa Fox once brought in for show and tell. It performed four basic math functions and displayed the result on a tiny LCD screen. We regarded the calculator as nothing short of a miracle.

When I tell my own kids about the devices I used throughout childhood – the phones bolted to the wall, the typewriters, the dense volumes of the encyclopedia – they listen with a certain pitying incredulity, as if I were describing the customs of early hominids roaming the Serengeti for edible tree bark.

And who can blame them? My oldest daughter was handed an iPad in first grade, as was her brother two years later. They speak to Siri as if she were an old friend. Granted, they are often asking Siri what it sounds like when a duck farts, then laughing hysterically. But still.

The point is that they are growing up in a world where hand-held devices offer immediate answers to practically any question or dilemma that may arise in their lives. They don’t see this as strange or troubling.

I do.

Outsourcing Our Brains Steve Lettau 2016-08-11 05:00:00Z 0
FYI United States Summer Olympic Medal Count Over Time Steve Lettau 2016-08-08 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Aug 03, 2016

From the August 2016 issue of The Rotarian

1) BECAUSE WE ARE ABOUT TO ERADICATE A DISEASE, AND YOU CAN BE A PART OF IT

We are 99.9 percent of the way toward ending polio. As of early June, there were only 16 cases of wild poliovirus in the world, and many think this could be the year we see the last naturally occurring case of polio.

As Rotary and our partners work to eradicate the poliovirus in Afghanistan and Pakistan, the remaining endemic countries, we also continue immunization campaigns in other high-risk countries to ensure that the disease remains gone for good. You can participate on the ground. Email polioplus@rotary.org to connect with Rotarians leading upcoming trips. 

Also consider using your network to spread the word and make sure polio stays on the global agenda. Provide a link to endpolio.org in your email signature. Follow End Polio Now on Facebook and Twitter and share the story of polio eradication with your social networks. When your legislators speak at club meetings, make sure you bring up polio funding. “The fact we are grassroots enables us to have a tremendous amount of influence,” says International PolioPlus Chair Michael McGovern. Host a community event to celebrate World Polio Day on 24 October; register your event and download resources at endpolio.org.

Donate now and your contribution will be matched 2-to-1 by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. Go to www.endpolio.org.

Reasons to Love Rotary Right Now Steve Lettau 2016-08-03 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Jul 28, 2016

A video thanking Rotary's major donors for their commitment, advocacy and generosity.

 
You Are Champions Steve Lettau 2016-07-28 05:00:00Z 0
You Are Champions Steve Lettau 2016-07-28 05:00:00Z 0
You are Champions 2016-07-27 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Jul 21, 2016

By Peter King Oloo, a member of the Rotaract Club of Kie, Rwanda

Nearly 140 Rotaractors and guests from across the East African countries of Tanzania, Burundi, Kenya and Uganda gathered in Rwanda on 26 March to participate in the monthly cleaning exercise in Rwanda called Umuganda.

The Rotaractors, through their award-winning annual project called REACT (Rotaract East Africa Impact), had organized a project to construct kitchen gardens and raise funds for medical insurance. Both these activities were geared toward helping the community of the 1994 Rwanda genocide survivors who were resettled in Kinyinya village in Kigali.

These survivors were resettled under the Peace and Hope Initiative. We sought to carry out a project with some guests that would be sustainable and enable the people at this community to feed themselves for longer term.

The community was trained with practice to construct kitchen gardens in tight spaces and to balance their diet. By the end of the project, 50 kitchen gardens had been constructed.

Miss Rwanda 2016, Miss Jolly Mutesi, joined us and implored the young girls at the center to be hard workers and make wise choices. She told stories of girls who had listened to the promises of boys in the village, and then found themselves alone once they became pregnant.

We raised 500,000 Rwandan Francs for medical insurance, enough to cover 167 individuals for a year. The project was hosted by the Rotaract Club of Kigali City and the Rotaract Club of KIE and was the fourth annual REACT project after Uganda (2013), Burundi (2014) and Kenya (2015). The 2017 leg will be held in Tanzania and its concept is in development.

African youth construct kitchen gardens for genocide survivors Steve Lettau 2016-07-21 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Jul 21, 2016

Mark your calendars for the evening of Thursday, July 21st for our annual meal-prep for Advocates and family cook-out at River Barn Park's Sommer Pavilion.

Arrive anytime between 4:30-6:30pm.

Please bring disposable meal containers of medium to large size to Friday’s Rotary meeting. We are in need of approximately 60 containers to successfully package meals for the women and children staying at Advocate’s shelter. If everyone could bring 2 containers from home, we would be all set!

Jennifer Sutherland

Save the date Steve Lettau 2016-07-21 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Jul 14, 2016

By Jon Kaufman, a member of the Rotary Club of Peninsula Sunrise, California, USA

The installation of two water plants in rural villages in Nepal now produce more than 20,000 liters of safe drinking water every day, using solar wind as their power source. We helped install the SunSpring ultra-filtration systems the week of 1 July through 7 July as part of the ongoing H2OpenDoors project sponsored by my Rotary club and partnering clubs.

I was able to raise the $50,000 for these units at two different golf tournaments in 2015, thanks to hundreds of generous donors. The tournaments were held in Half Moon Bay, California, and Itasca, Illinois.

The Rotary project worked with Helping Hands, a Nepal non-government organization headed by Narayan Shrestha. Narayan, a Boulder, Colorado, businessman with deep roots in Nepal, has built hospitals and schools in that country and is widely respected among the Himalayan communities. In the small town of Khandabar, Helping Hands has built a school for 700 students. While they do get mountain spring water through the property, the quality is not safe to drink. The SunSpring system now purifies the supply, and tanks and distributes to the main canteen for teachers and students to enjoy.

Golf tournaments fund clean water for Nepal Steve Lettau 2016-07-14 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Jul 14, 2016

We know that Lobsterfest is our signature fund raising event.

We also know how important event sponsors are to a successful Lobsterfest.

To maximize our sponsor solicitation efforts, we need to avoid both multiple calls and no calls on potential sponsors.

Simply put … our challenge is knowing which sponsors have been or will be called on and by whom PLUS once having this information, how do we best share it with 40+ club members in real time.

This brings us to this short video which will introduce you to a simple, easy to use process that will help us better manage this critical part of our fundraising effort.

Managing Lobsterfest Sponsor Calls Made Easy Steve Lettau 2016-07-14 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Jul 07, 2016

From the July 2016 issue of The Rotarian

Just before John Germ dropped by, Rick Youngblood took a deep breath. “You want to match his energy,” he says, “but he makes it hard to keep up.” Youngblood is the president and CEO of Blood Assurance, a regional blood bank in Chattanooga, Tenn., that Germ helped found in 1972. After his visit with Youngblood, Germ strode between mountains of empty bottles and cans at Chattanooga’s John F. Germ Recycling Center at Orange Grove, which he designed, before he drove to a construction site and popped a cork to dedicate a Miracle League field where special needs children will play baseball – all before zipping to the airport for a flight to Chicago and a cab ride to Rotary International World Headquarters, where he takes office as president of RI this month.

Why the breakneck pace? “I don’t have hobbies,” he says. “Civic work is my recreation.”

Not long ago Germ, 77, spent a raucous evening at the Chattanooga Convention Center, enjoying jokes at his expense. “John is a very influential person,” his friend Harry Fields announced from the podium. “I can’t tell you how many people emulate him … at Halloween. I mean, he’s the epitome of tall, dark, and handsome. When it’s dark, he’s handsome!” Nobody laughed harder than the guest of honor at the celebration of his contributions, which was referred to as the “roast of John Germ.” The dinner raised more than $75,000 for Chattanooga State Community College. In closing, Fields noted Germ’s contribution to his community and the world: “100 percent of himself – and everyone else he can shake down!”

John Germ: Champion of Chattanooga Steve Lettau 2016-07-07 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Jul 07, 2016

Our club website is now smart phone and tablet friendly!

MTSUNRISEROTARY.ORG is now smart phone and tablet friendly!

Responsive web design is the practice of building a website suitable to work on every device and every screen size, no matter how large or small, mobile or desktop. The concept of responsive web design becomes more critical as the percentage of site viewers using mobile devices continues to increase.

So visit our club website using a mobile device to see what all this means first hand. I hope you enjoy your enhanced viewing experience.

Our club website is now smart phone and tablet friendly! Steve Lettau 2016-07-07 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Jun 30, 2016

The Declaration of Independence

We celebrate American Independence Day on the Fourth of July every year. We think of July 4, 1776, as a day that represents the Declaration of Independence and the birth of the United States of America as an independent nation.

But July 4, 1776 wasn't the day that the Continental Congress decided to declare independence (they did that on July 2, 1776).

It wasn’t the day we started the American Revolution either (that had happened back in April 1775).

And it wasn't the day Thomas Jefferson wrote the first draft of the Declaration of Independence (that was in June 1776). Or the date on which the Declaration was delivered to Great Britain (that didn't happen until November 1776). Or the date it was signed (that was August 2, 1776).

 

So what did happen on July 4, 1776?

The Continental Congress approved the final wording of the Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776. They'd been working on it for a couple of days after the draft was submitted on July 2nd and finally agreed on all of the edits and changes.

July 4, 1776, became the date that was included on the Declaration of Independence, and the fancy handwritten copy that was signed in August (the copy now displayed at the National Archives in Washington, D.C.) It’s also the date that was printed on the Dunlap Broadsides, the original printed copies of the Declaration that were circulated throughout the new nation. So when people thought of the Declaration of Independence, July 4, 1776 was the date they remembered.

In contrast, we celebrate Constitution Day on September 17th of each year, the anniversary of the date the Constitution was signed, not the anniversary of the date it was approved. If we’d followed this same approach for the Declaration of Independence we’d being celebrating Independence Day on August 2nd of each year, the day the Declaration of Independence was signed!

 

How did the Fourth of July become a national holiday?

For the first 15 or 20 years after the Declaration was written, people didn’t celebrate it much on any date. It was too new and too much else was happening in the young nation. By the 1790s, a time of bitter partisan conflicts, the Declaration had become controversial. One party, the Democratic-Republicans, admired Jefferson and the Declaration. But the other party, the Federalists, thought the Declaration was too French and too anti-British, which went against their current policies.

By 1817, John Adams complained in a letter that America seemed uninterested in its past. But that would soon change.

After the War of 1812, the Federalist party began to come apart and the new parties of the 1820s and 1830s all considered themselves inheritors of Jefferson and the Democratic-Republicans. Printed copies of the Declaration began to circulate again, all with the date July 4, 1776, listed at the top. The deaths of Thomas Jefferson and John Adams on July 4, 1826, may even have helped to promote the idea of July 4 as an important date to be celebrated.

Celebrations of the Fourth of July became more common as the years went on and in 1870, almost a hundred years after the Declaration was written, Congress first declared July 4 to be a national holiday as part of a bill to officially recognize several holidays, including Christmas. Further legislation about national holidays, including July 4, was passed in 1939 and 1941.

The Story of the Fourth of July Steve Lettau 2016-06-30 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Jun 23, 2016

By Ian W. Geddes, past governor of District 1020 (Scotland)

I have many Rotary stories to tell, but this one happened in Colombia. I was chosen by my district to lead a Group Study Exchange team to Bogota. As a Spanish teacher in Scotland, my dream had long been to travel to South America. Having been chosen as leader and then having negotiated a sabbatical from my school, my team and I finally set off for Colombia.

One week into the trip, the day after we had visited the fabled El Dorado, I fell ill. At first I thought it was just altitude sickness as we traveled along the Andes at 11,000 feet above sea-level. But no, it turned out to be appendicitis.

The day Rotarians saved my exchange Steve Lettau 2016-06-23 05:00:00Z 0
Summer Concert Series in Mequon Rotary Park July 15 & 16 Steve Lettau 2016-06-23 05:00:00Z 0
Attention MT Sunrise Rotary Members Steve Lettau 2016-06-23 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Jun 17, 2016

Dr. Demond Means - Administrator / Superintendent speaks to MT Sunrise Rotary Club on the Opportunity Schools & Partnership program. Photo by Bob Blazich.

Topic - Opportunity Schools & Partnership program Steve Lettau 2016-06-17 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Jun 16, 2016

The Rotary Foundation has been improving lives since 1917. Learn about our work and be inspired to join us in meeting humanity’s greatest challenges! (This video premiered at the 2016 Rotary International Assembly.)

Rotary Foundation - A Century of Doing Good in the World Steve Lettau 2016-06-16 05:00:00Z 0
Visit the all new GMRP web site Steve Lettau 2016-06-16 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Jun 09, 2016

By Linda Mulhern, a member of the Rotary Club of St. Paul, Minnesota, USA

When you become a Rotary Youth Exchange student, you never imagine how it might affect you in the long term. In my case, my exchange has connected my family in more ways than one.

As a Youth Exchange student to Sweden in 1979-80, I learned a lot about what I was capable of doing on my own, my strengths and weaknesses, and what it took to overcome obstacles. I had an incredible year in Sweden, and still speak Swedish fluently. I have contacts with many friends and communicate regularly with my host parents and host sisters.

After my exchange, I met my husband in ROTEX, a group for Rotary Youth Exchange alumni. He had been a Youth Exchange student to Argentina, and we bonded over travel stories. Once we had kids, I knew our experiences might inspire them to travel.

Our son has taken part in a Rotary Youth Exchange to Turkey and our daughter is currently on a Youth Exchange in Finland. She is one of three girls on a boys hockey team and loves it. We have also hosted over 20 Youth Exchange students over the years.

Dinner conversation

I have used my Swedish in my profession, and both my husband and I have been able to reach out to people with our language abilities. Our children are able to talk about world events at the dinner table, and we have received many compliments from our children’s friends about how fun it is to talk about world cultures, languages, and politics at the dinner table. They love the laughter, but also realize that to follow the conversation, they need to stay current on world events.

I am most proud of my kids because they will find ways to be inclusive with everyone they meet, find common interests, and start conversations to learn more about the world.

Share your Youth Exchange experience. Your story can inspire others to travel and learn as well.

Rotary Youth Exchange has touched my entire family Steve Lettau 2016-06-09 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Jun 02, 2016

Editors note: You can read more of Lance's blog posts from Africa at hwb-intl.org/travel-blogs/.

We want to welcome each and every one of you to our travel blog. We can't wait to tell you what we are doing.

Thank you to each and everyone of you who have supported us, whether it was through a donation, emotional support, in-kind donations or just encouragement. We THANK YOU.

So, let's go on this adventure TOGETHER...me and you (see latest blog post below).

Welcome to our adventure Steve Lettau 2016-06-02 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Jun 02, 2016

Have you ever wondered how and why The Rotary Foundation (TRF) was started and who initiated it?

Do you still have questions about Rotary’s Annual Fund, the Endowment Fund and Polio Plus?

Well bring those questions and others to Rotary on Friday and have them answered.

The Rotary Foundation (TRF)  presentation on Friday promises to be informative, will inspire you to learn more on it’s evolution and impact of doing good in the world and hopefully will cause you to take action to continue it’s good work today and in the future.

Friday's Presentation - The Rotary Foundation Steve Lettau 2016-06-02 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Jun 01, 2016

By Jen Rieger

Today we drove out to the Huruma slums of Nairobi. What an experience. All the cars, trucks, animals, and people coverged into one chaotic torrent going every which way. The roads are so worn and full of deep holes that it is a wonder we didn't lose a tire. Smells of cooking meats took turns with smells of human waste, exhaust fumes, and garbage wafting into our windows.  Once we were actually in the slums, we were instructed to close our windows to prevent people from reaching in to take belongings. 

The slums are gated, and the roads are very narrow.  Not to mention they are littered with trash, people, goods, and children playing.  I have a newfound respect for our drivers, who are also our guides. After squeezing our 3 vans through a winding maze, we arrived at the Ark Childrens School, home to 355 kids. We were met with grateful teachers and excited students.  Our first mission was to give deworming medication to all the students.  While they had sour faces for us due to the not so great taste of the medication, their frowns turned to smiles when they were given a piece of candy, a rare commodity.

Next we grouped off into 3 rooms where we saw all the sick children, and a pharmacy room to dispense the treatment. Then the children came flooding in. In just a few hours, together we examined and treated around 100 children and adults for a wide varity of ailments.  We saw scabies, tinea capitus, folliculitis, skin infections, fractures, lice, malaria, molescum contageosum, ear infections with perforated ear drums, tonsillitis, ring worm, pneumonia, pharyngitis, urinary tract infections, and prenatal cares. I was in the pharmacy and it was very busy. All the children were ushered in for their medication with eager outstretched hands.  The 4 hours we were at the school flew by.

Afterward the ladies of the community invited us up to check out their hand sewn bags and purses.  Most of us had to take home a gorgeous colorful hand sewn souvaneir, for an unbeatable price to boot.  Before our journey home the school leaders, and our entire team took up hands and said prayers and thank you's.

After our long day we were all famished. Four of us attempted to make peanut butter and jelly sandwiches in the back of the van while driving. The roads were so bumpy and wild, it was like making sandwiches on a roller coaster. Our ride back to the hotel was long, rough, and congested. It was rush hour in Nairobi and the roads which were usually crowded were now a discombobulated cluster of chaos. Single lane roads turned into 3-4 lane roads of cars, trucks, people, and bicicles going every which way. Finally after battling traffic for a few hours we arrived back at our hotel, ready for evening dinner.  Tonight will be a refreshing hot (hopefully) shower, and a good night's sleep to get us ready for a new adventure tomorrow. Tomorrow we will be traveling, and internet access may be sporadic.

We will try to update the blog if possible.

Huruma Slums Clinic Day - HWB Blog Steve Lettau 2016-06-01 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Jun 01, 2016

On Saturday, JUNE 4, our M-T Sunrise Rotary partner, Ozaukee Washington Land Trust, is planning a short workday to PLANT native tree seedlings and shrubs in Pukaite Woods.  We'll probably work up to four hours.  CAN YOU HELP FOR SOME OR ALL OF THOSE HOURS?

The new trees & shrubs will help crowd out re-growth of the buckthorn along the streambed from which OWLT volunteers (and Dave Schlageter) removed mature buckthorn through the fall and earlier this spring.

Please respond, and let me know if you (and any family or friends) can join us even for an hour or two on June 4, between 10:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m.   We need to know what tools/equipment we'll need.

Connie Pukaite

Stewardship Planting at Pukaite Woods in Rotary Park Steve Lettau 2016-06-01 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on May 27, 2016
MT Sunrise Rotary Vice President Cindy Shaffer (left) welcomes our newest member JoAnn Vetter (right).
Welcome JoAnn Vetter Steve Lettau 2016-05-27 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on May 26, 2016

By Gordon Matthews, past governor of District 6920 (Georgia, USA), Rotary Club of Savannah East

A panel of three young members spelled out for us the issues that block young people from joining Rotary during our spring assembly a few years ago — scheduling, cost of dues, and rules.

I’ve been active in developing leaders in our community and have worked with our Group Study Exchange teams in the past, so I know the energy and potential in this “under 40” generation that we need to tap for Rotary. But I’ve also seen several Rotary clubs try to do this with limited results, because they stayed too close to the traditional model and dues structure.

Breaking the mold

To break that mold, I asked the son of a fellow member to gather a group of young people in the metro area of Savannah to explore the idea of starting a new club. I told them their are really just a few rules – to meet weekly, pay dues, and train a president-elect. The rest are just a lot of traditions. They were directed to develop a format that would meet their needs.

What does a Rotary club designed by younger members look like? Steve Lettau 2016-05-26 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on May 19, 2016

The 2016 Council on Legislation may well be remembered as one of the most progressive in Rotary history.

Not only did this Council grant clubs more freedom in determining their meeting schedule and membership, it also approved an increase in per capita dues of $4 a year for three years. The increase will be used to enhance Rotary’s website, improve online tools, and add programs and services to help clubs increase membership.

The Council is an essential element of Rotary’s governance. Every three years, members from around the world gather in Chicago to consider proposed changes to the policies that govern the organization and its member clubs. Measures that are adopted take effect 1 July.

The tone for this year was set early, when the RI Board put forth two proposals that increase flexibility. The first measure allows clubs to decide to vary their meeting times, whether to meet online or in person, and when to cancel a meeting, as long as they meet at least twice a month. The second allows clubs flexibility in choosing their membership rules and requirements. Both passed.

Representatives also approved removing six membership criteria from the RI Constitution and replacing them with a simple requirement that a member be a person of good character who has a good reputation in their business or community and is willing to serve the community.

The $4 per year dues increase was based on a five-year financial forecast that predicted that if Rotary didn’t either raise dues or make drastic cuts, its reserves would dip below mandated levels by 2020. The yearly per capita dues that clubs pay to RI will be $60 in 2017-18, $64 in 2018-19, and $68 in 2019-20. The next council will establish the rate after that.

“We are at a moment in time when we must think beyond the status quo,” said RI Vice President Greg E. Podd. “We must think about our future.”

Podd said the dues increase will allow RI to improve My Rotary, develop resources so clubs can offer a better membership experience, simplify club and district reporting, improve website access for Rotaractors, and update systems to keep Rotary in compliance with changing global regulations.

Also because of this Council’s decisions:

  • A Council on Resolutions will meet annually online to consider resolutions — recommendations to the RI Board. Council members will be selected for three-year terms. They’ll participate in the Council on Resolutions for three years and the Council on Legislation in their final year only. The Council on Resolutions will free the Council on Legislation to concentrate on enactments — changes to Rotary’s governing documents. Proponents predict that the Council on Legislation can then be shortened by a day, saving $300,000.
  • Rotaractors will be allowed to become members of Rotary clubs while they are still in Rotaract. Proponents argued that too few Rotaractors (around 5 percent) join Rotary. Sometimes it’s because they don’t want to leave their Rotaract clubs before they have to, upon reaching age 30. It’s hoped that giving them more options will boost the numbers of qualified young leaders in Rotary.
  • The distinction between e-clubs and traditional clubs will be eliminated. The Council recognized that clubs have been meeting in a number of ways, and given this flexibility, the distinction was no longer meaningful. Clubs that have “e-club” in their names can keep it, however.
  • The reference to admission fees will be removed from the bylaws. Proponents argued that the mention of admission fees does not advance a modern image of Rotary.
  • A standing committee on membership was established, in recognition that membership is a top priority of the organization, and polio eradication was also reaffirmed to be a goal of the highest order.
Council grants clubs greater flexibility in meeting, membership Steve Lettau 2016-05-19 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on May 11, 2016

 

 

By Rotary communications staff

How do you tell the story of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative in comic-book form? That was the challenge that four Rotary staffers – Chris Brown, Brad Cowan, Kate Benzschawel and Stuart Cleland — faced in the summer of 2015. They needed an angle that would cover the major aspects of the GPEI’s work. But it had to be a story, not just a list of organizations and achievements.

Luckily, Kate had spotted “Polio Partners” in the September issue of The Rotarian, and suggested the team base the comic on the four pillars of the eradication effort – virus hunters, strategists, advocates and immunizers. “They could be super-heroes,” said someone. “And they protect kids,” said another. “They’re the Agents of GPEI!” added a third.

That’s how it started. Soon, Stuart and Chris had written a script. Chris, whose non-Rotary alter ego is the artist 360°, began creating characters and experimenting with color and style as a paneled comic. Brad converted Chris’s work into a motion-comic, spending hours along with Kate tweaking frames, adding music and sound effects, and incorporating notes from the PolioPlus team.

The result – The Agents of Polio Eradication. We hope you enjoy it. And share it with your friends!

The story behind The Agents of Polio Eradication Steve Lettau 2016-05-11 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on May 05, 2016

From the May 2016 issue of The Rotarian

More than a million refugees from Syria, Iraq, and Afghanistan streamed into the European Union last year. Most entered via Greece after a harrowing raft trip across the Aegean Sea from Turkey. Once there, they made their way north, often on foot, traveling more than 1,000 miles through the rugged mountains of the Balkan countries toward Germany.

That was the uncertain odyssey facing Muhammad Mallah Hamza, a 26-year-old ethnic Kurd, in late 2014 when he decided to leave his native Syria. The trip would lead the recent college graduate to a picturesque Austrian village – and into the arms of a local Rotary club that would allow him to begin a new life while helping others in his situation.

Crisis at the doorstep Steve Lettau 2016-05-05 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Apr 29, 2016

After Jeff's brother died in his arms tragically on his twentieth birthday Jeff Wenzler vowed to find meaning in life. Practically a boy himself, he set off on an adventure.

This journey, which he weaves into his own leadership, took him out of his comfort zone to search for purpose and his calling in life.  He has searched from mountain villages and corrupt governments to corporate board meetings and bottom lines; from prestigious universities to orphanages; from the Kingston city garbage dump in Jamaica to the largest community settlement in a city garbage dump in Central America.

Jeff has taught and served countless people over the past decade and a half, both in the US & internationally. An educator and adventurer at heart, Jeff is committed to helping others develop perspective on the world around us. For more information visit http://www.pivotaldirections.org/home.html

Photo by: Bob Blazich

Jeff Wenzler featured speaker Steve Lettau 2016-04-29 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Apr 29, 2016

We are pleased to welcome Peter Welch as our newest Member to our club this morning. Pictured above are from left: Steve Lettau (sponsor) and Peter Welch.

A Rotary welcome to Peter Welch Steve Lettau 2016-04-29 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Apr 28, 2016

By Jon Kaufman, director of H2OpenDoors

Along with 40 friends and supporters of the H2OpenDoors project, I took part in an eight-day exploratory expedition to Cuba on 8 April.

Members of six Rotary clubs in District 5150 and their friends and family joined The Bay Area Cuba Community Alliance, starting on the far eastern side of the island for a visit and site survey at a small village in Granma province. Each person presented a suitcase of donations to the Town Delegate in an emotional ceremony.

Diana Henderson and Helena Marsh, members of the Rotary Club of San Rafael, hold up the Cuban flag.

Baseball equipment, animal husbandry tools, school supplies, and children’s clothing were among the gifts for over 550 residents. The town had been home to one of the best community baseball teams in Cuba, but they have been unable to play for over two years for lack of equipment. After a great ball game, the town elders hosted us for a lunch feast.

Opening doors in Cuba Steve Lettau 2016-04-28 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Apr 21, 2016

From the March 2016 issue of The Rotarian

One of the keynote speakers at this year’s Rotary International Convention in Korea will be Dananjaya Hettiarachchi, the founder and CEO of a human resources development and communications firm in Sri Lanka. In addition to being a much-sought-after motivational speaker, trainer, and executive coach, Hettiarachchi holds claim to a title that many seek but few attain: world champion of public speaking.

In 2014, Hettiarachchi bested some 33,000 competitors from around the world to become the first Asian-born winner of the Toastmasters International World Championship of Public Speaking, which began in 1938. In his championship speech, “I See Something,” Hettiarachchi recounted how he reversed the course of a troubled youth and got on a path to success after being introduced to a mentor who told him, “I see something in you, but I don’t know what it is.”

THE ROTARIAN: Will it be a special challenge to speak at the Rotary Convention? Have you decided on a topic?

HETTIARACHCHI: More than a challenge, it will be a privilege. Since speaking is what I do day in and day out, it is an opportunity that I look forward to. I have focused on a broader theme of bringing out the leader in you first and how, during that process, you could contribute more toward the people around you and society at large.

TR: What are the essential elements of a good speech?

HETTIARACHCHI: One of the most important elements is to be authentic. Your voice is as unique as your fingerprint. Your voice, tone, rate, pitch, and volume tell who you are. People need to buy in to you before they buy in to what you’re saying or selling.

Q&A: Champion speaker answers some rhetorical questions Steve Lettau 2016-04-21 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Apr 20, 2016

Roy Pirrung, 67, of Plymouth, Wisconsin was told, “You can’t Roy!” many times, from childhood until the time he signed up for his first foot race, the Mayfair Marathon.  In a mere 26.2 miles he changed the configuration of that saying to, “You can TRY!”

After observing an obese woman jogging past his house while he was laid off from work and painting his garage he thought, “If she can do it, I can do it!”

Pirrung, obese, with a 2-pack-a-day habit, struggled for air just to walk up a flight of stairs.  He suffered through shin splints and other maladies as he ran each day, eventually reaching his goal to run 2-miles.

The rest is history.  Pirrung, now an ultra marathon runner, has completed 138 marathons and 197 ultra marathons. He has broken over 70 American Records and has garnered 82 National Titles.  He is a world masters champion and an age group world record holder. He has competed internationally over 50 times, in 21 countries and gained entry to USATFs Masters Hall of Fame.

Roy Pirrung shares his story with MT Sunrise Rotary club Steve Lettau 2016-04-20 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Apr 14, 2016

From the April 2016 issue of The Rotarian

America’s most-visited national park, the Great Smoky Mountains, is a half-million acres of temperate forest bristling with biodiversity – as 30 species of salamanders and some 1,500 black bears attest. Yet the contours of the park, in Tennessee and North Carolina in nearly equal measures, might have been drawn differently if not for several members of the Rotary Club of Knoxville, Tenn., a role the club marked during its centennial celebration last August.

In 1915, David C. Chapman, the owner of a wholesale drug company and a veteran of the Spanish-American War, brought together 10 business leaders over lunch, and the club’s illustrious future was set. Eight years later, Anne Davis, who with her Rotarian husband, Willis, had just visited parks in the American West, asked club members, “Why can’t we have a national park in the Smokies?” The Davises got Chapman on board. Heartened by the National Park Service’s recommendation to situate a park in the Southeast, Chapman transformed an idea into action.

Blazing a trail to a national park in the Smokies Steve Lettau 2016-04-14 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Apr 08, 2016

Emily Biagi - Restoration Manager at Mequon Nature Preserve discusses bird migration at our Friday morning meeting. (Photo: Bob Blazich)

Mequon Nature Preserve - Bird Migration Steve Lettau 2016-04-08 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Apr 07, 2016

Spreading throughout Mequon - Thiensville, teasel grows in tall, barbed stalks, blooming with purple and white thistle flowers in Summer.

Sinking deep taproots into the soil, teasel depletes land of nutrients and crowds out native plants, disrupts ecosystems, diminishes native plant diversity and destroys food and habitats for birds and wildlife.

Eliminating teasel is a multiple-year effort regardless of treatment, since seeds persist in the soil for several years. Getting a control on teasel now, will greatly benefit the region in years to come.

What: Teasel Take-Out Day
Where: Oriole Lane School
When: Saturday, April 23, 2016 from 10:00 AM - 2:00 PM
Note: Dress right for conditions

Teasel Take-Out Day Steve Lettau 2016-04-07 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Apr 07, 2016

The Oliveros Scholarship Fund was created to help a secondary level student in grades 7-12 continue their schooling. In the village we serve, Oliveros, Guatemala, the school only goes to sixth grade. After that, students have to travel to Chiquimulilla, a city that's about 15 miles from Oliveros, to continue their education. flag

Typically, most students in Oliveros do not go past sixth grade. This is especially true for young girls. The students who receive our scholarships, and we now have over 30 students involved, are recommended by their elementary school teachers and must maintain good grades in order to continue to receive their scholarship. For $130/year, a student receives books, tuition, uniform, and transportation.

The scholarship idea came from Jeannine Desautels, a Madison Rotarian, who is a long-time member of our medical team in Guatemala. The fund continues to be managed by Jeannine and her fellow Madison Rotarians. Donations are accepted in any amount, and all funds received are used for scholarships.

If you would like to support this effort, please mail your donation to:

Treasurer, Oliveros Scholarship Fund
17 Hemlock Trail
Madison, WI 53717

Please make check payable to Oliveros Scholarship Fund

Oliveros Scholarship Fund Steve Lettau 2016-04-07 05:00:00Z 0
Tee Up for Charity - July 25th Steve Lettau 2016-03-31 05:00:00Z 0
Doing Good in the World: Introduction Steve Lettau 2016-03-31 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Mar 31, 2016

From the April 2016 issue of The Rotarian

There is a new ritual in American life. It goes like this: Whenever you invite someone to dinner, you must inquire about any special dietary needs. Because today, it seems that nearly everyone has drawn a line around foods that cannot pass their lips.

This could be because of allergies, moral qualms, lifestyle choices, health issues, or simple preference. The person might be a vegetarian who eats fish, a carnivore who hates carbs, a glutton who avoids gluten, or a time bomb waiting to be set off by a nut. (Asking ahead makes for a more pleasant evening than calling an ambulance.)

Hospitalization aside, one reason for this shift has been the moralization of food. Our dining choices have become identity choices, a way of saying, “This is the kind of person I am,” or “This is the kind of world I want to live in.”

This is a luxury of our age. The hunters, villagers, and small bands of Homo sapiens in times past would have thought it extremely strange, and possibly hostile, to assert one’s preferences in this manner.

Culture: Dinner for one Steve Lettau 2016-03-31 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Mar 24, 2016

From the April 2016 issue of The Rotarian

What Kerstin Jeska-Thorwart remembers is the silence. No birds chirping, no dogs barking, no car engines revving. Nothing. “I’ve never heard such a silence before, and never since,” she says. “I knew something must have happened.”

It was 9:35 the morning after Christmas 2004, and in Sri Lanka, it was a Poya Day, a Buddhist public holiday held every full moon. Jeska-Thorwart, a lawyer from Germany, was on vacation in Hikkaduwa, on the island’s southwestern coast. Any other morning of her holiday she and her husband would have been on the beach, but today they stayed back at their vacation home, up a small hill about a half-mile from the water’s edge, to clean and prepare for guests.

After a few minutes, sound returned, as though it had been switched on. Now she heard people running, crying. She went down the main road to see what had happened. She saw people in swimming suits, shoeless, covered in blood.

They told her there was a big wave.

The tsunami, as she later learned, was caused when an earthquake with the estimated force of 23,000 atomic bombs rattled the floor of the Indian Ocean. The seabed rose 10 feet, displacing 7 cubic miles of water. A wall of water, in some places up to 100 feet high, slammed into countries throughout Southeast Asia and as far away as Africa. All told, more than 230,000 people died in 14 countries, and 1.7 million were left homeless. More than half of the dead were in Indonesia, followed by Sri Lanka, where 35,000 people were killed.

A Wave of Compassion Steve Lettau 2016-03-24 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Mar 17, 2016

From the March 2016 issue of The Rotarian

Dhaka, the capital of Bangladesh, is the 11th-largest city on earth. Nearly a third of its 15 million residents live in trash-strewn slums, subsisting on less than $2 a day. Women have it worst: Second-class citizens, often married off in their midteens, many struggle to raise children in conditions most Westerners would find medieval. A recent study found that “65 percent of slum women share one toilet with more than seven families.”

Into this “difficulty” steps Hashrat Ara. “Difficulty” is her understatement of the challenges a physician faces in Washpur, one of Dhaka’s poorest townships. A vast maze of dirt-floored huts made of wood and corrugated metal, Washpur floods each monsoon season, leaving its inhabitants ankle-deep in polluted water. Yet life goes on – with help from one of Rotary International’s “Global Women of Action.”

Moved to action Steve Lettau 2016-03-17 05:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Mar 10, 2016

I received a call from Big Brothers Big Sisters of Ozaukee County asking if we are interested in doing the Bowl for Kids' Sake again this year.

They have available lanes this Friday and next Friday evenings if anyone is interested. I can't do this Friday, but I can do next Friday. I'd be happy to handle the logistics if we can field a team for either week. We need teams of 5 or 6. Each individual would need a minimum of $75 in pledges to take part.

It takes place at Harbor Hills in Port Washington. Dinner is served at 6:30pm and bowling begins at 7:15pm. For more information, check out their website: http://www.bbbsoz.org/events/bowl-for-kids-sake/

If you're interested, please let me know and we'll see if we can get a team or two together.

Thanks!

Chad
chad@burntcow.com

Bowling for Big Brothers Big Sisters Steve Lettau 2016-03-10 06:00:00Z 0

By Susan Kim WTMJ-TV Milwaukee

Former reporter and anchor Melissa McCrady covered hundreds of stories during her seven years at TODAY'S TMJ4. In many ways, she is now covering the most important story of her life.

Her time in front of a computer these days isn't to research a story, something she did for years as a journalist.  These days, her research is all about Charlie.

Charlie is almost one. He's the son of Melissa and her husband Al Cheslock. Melissa said she had an easy pregnancy. Al said it was great holding his son for the first time in the hospital.

"Obviously, our first child, a son and child, obviously you just love him so much," Al said.

But soon, they embarked on an emotional journey to figure out why their beautiful little boy wasn't thriving. His heart rate had dropped during delivery, he was born with an extra thumb and large birthmark, both on the right side of his body. Charlie wasn't breathing as well as doctors would have liked, but still, Melissa and Al got to take their new baby home.

 

 

If you would like to follow Charlie's story, Melissa has an emotional blog that you can find here: Click Here

Melissa McCrady seeks answers for her son 2016-03-10 06:00:00Z 0
Tamie Koop presents program on recent trip to Cuba Steve Lettau 2016-03-10 06:00:00Z 0
Rotary District 6270 TV Ad Steve Lettau 2016-03-10 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Mar 10, 2016

By: Jim Blasingame, Contributing Writer Milwaukee Business Journal

It was 120 years ago when a lawyer named Paul J. Harris moved his practice to Chicago. Harris enjoyed the new opportunity his adopted city afforded, but he missed the friendly relationships he remembered from growing up in a small Vermont town.

One fall day in 1900, while walking around the Windy City’s North Side with Bob Frank, Harris noticed the connections his friend had made with local shopkeepers and it made him long for this kind of interaction. He wondered if, like himself, other professionals who had emigrated from rural America to the big cities might be experiencing the same feeling of loss.

Over the next few years, Harris couldn’t stop asking himself this question: Could such human connection activity be channeled into organized settings for professionals and business people?

For Rotary and BNI, membership is all about this 'Power Question' Steve Lettau 2016-03-10 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Mar 10, 2016

Congratulations to our fellow MT Sunrise Rotarians on receiving Paul Harris awards. Left to right: Terry Schacht, Connie Pukaite, Bob Blazich and Mike Kim.

CONGRATULATIONS! Steve Lettau 2016-03-10 06:00:00Z 0
Posted by Steve Lettau on Mar 09, 2016

MIDWEST PETS is a premier training event for Rotary Presidents-Elect. Midwest PETS provides required training to serve as club president, as well as inspiration, and motivation. Midwest PETS is a SEVEN DISTRICT, 300+clubs training event, with an atmosphere of a mini Rotary International convention.  Speakers, District Governors-Elect, trainers and facilitators all have one thing in mind: equip and excite club presidents-elect for their year of service.

The purpose of the presidents-elect training seminar (PETS) is to develop and assist club presidents who have the necessary skills, knowledge, and motivation to lead an effective club. It was held in Itasca, Il  March 4-6th.

Thank you to all who contributed with items to be donated to veterans.  The response was overwhelming.

Ellen MacFarlane (TM Rotary) and Lucia Francis (MT Sunrise) attend PETS Steve Lettau 2016-03-09 06:00:00Z 0